Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 11 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 3/31/18

The Bolton Appointment: How Scared Should We Be?

By       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     (# of views)   No comments
Author 502273
Message Daniel Lazare
Become a Fan
  (2 fans)

From Consortium News


(Image by Daniel Lazare)   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -

John Bolton is a hawk's hawk, a militarist who never saw a U.S. war of aggression he didn't like. The best thing one can say about his appointment as national security adviser is that Trump will probably ignore him the way he does all his other advisers and fire him six months down the road. If so, the sky won't fall right away. But make no mistake -- it will soon.

Rarely has war fever in Washington been deeper and more broad-based. Everybody's jumping on board -- liberals and conservatives, Republicans and Democrats, human-rights advocates and neoconservatives. With the 2018 midterms fast approaching, it seems that the only choice voters will have is between a military conflict from column A and one from column B. Which will it be -- the clash with Putin that liberals are talking themselves into? Or the showdown with Iran that Bolton has long advocated?

It's a choice between cyanide and arsenic. One moment, Trump is threatening "Little Rocket Man" Kim Jong Un with "fire and fury" while, in the next, the New York Times is demanding that he take off the gloves with regard to the Kremlin. The title of a Times editorial on Friday, March 15, said it all: "Finally, Trump Has Something Bad to Say About Russia."

- Advertisement -

It blasted the Orange-Haired One for being slow to impose sanctions in retaliation "for the Kremlin's interference in the 2016 election" -- still unproven, by the way -- and of holding off "for reasons that have never been made completely clear." This last point was rich considering how often the Times denounces Trump as a "Siberian candidate" that Russia installed in the White House to do its bidding. The editorial slammed Putin as "an authoritarian leader" who "has paid little or no price for his aggressions" in Syria and the Crimea, and it predicted that the Russian president "won't stop until he knows that the United States will stand up to him and work with its allies to impose stronger financial and diplomatic measures to rein him in."

If financial and diplomatic measures don't work, what then -- military force? Five days later, Editorial Page Editor James Bennet issued another schoolyard taunt, this time an editorial entitled, "Why Is Trump So Afraid of Russia?" The occasion was a remark that ex-CIA Director John Brennan had just made on MSNBC's "Morning Joe": "I think he's afraid of the president of Russia. ... The Russians, I think, have had long experience with Mr. Trump and may have things they could expose." (Quote begins at 5:05.) The comment was an excuse for yet more Times paranoia:

"The possibility that Mr. Putin could have some hold on the American president has lurked in the background over the past year as Mr. Trump displayed a mystifying affection for the Russian leader and ignored or excused his aggressive behavior and nefarious activities, most important, his interference in the 2016 campaign, a subject of the special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation."

- Advertisement -

Of course, it's a subject of Mueller's investigation, and it will continue to be so as long as Congress gives him carte blanche to look for dirt wherever he pleases, regardless of whether it has anything to do with Russian collusion or not. The editorial then went at Trump once again for the sin of insufficient hostility: "...it's hard to see how praising and appeasing a bully will advance American interests. That's not the approach Mr. Trump has taken with adversaries like North Korea or Iran, or, for that matter, even with some allies.

"If Mr. Trump isn't Mr. Putin's lackey," it concluded, "it's past time for him to prove it" -- perhaps by threatening to incinerate Moscow the way he has threatened Pyongyang.

The relationship between adolescent rhetoric like this and Trump's decision to bring semi-fascists like Bolton and Tea Partier Mike Pompeo on board is clear. The more the Times, not to mention the Washington Post, CNN, MSNBC, and others, taunt him as soft on Russia, the more he taunts them right back for being soft on Iran and then adopts confrontational tactics to demonstrate his own machismo.

Bolton is the latest example of where such tit-for-tat madness is leading. The former U.S. ambassador to the UN is famous as an opponent of the 2015 Iran nuclear accord and advocate of Iranian regime change. On this, he and Trump see eye to eye, which suggests that years of fist-shaking may finally give way to something more concrete, like cruise missiles and bunker-busting bombs.

With Pompeo as secretary of state, Trita Parsi, leader of the National Iranian American Council, tweets that "Trump is assembling a WAR CABINET" -- and the judgment may well be on the mark. If so, Tehran will undoubtedly respond by shoring up its defenses along the "Shi'ite crescent" stretching across Iraq and Syria to Lebanon. The Arab gulf states will ratchet up their anti-Shi'ite sectarianism while Turkey and Israel may conclude that it's now open season on Syria's Bashar al-Assad and likewise send in the bombers and troops.

After a momentary lull, the effect will be to thrust the region into yet another round of war, one even bigger and more ferocious than the last. All the usual horrors will ensue -- refugees, terrorism, social collapse, and renewed xenophobia in Europe and the US.

- Advertisement -

But Iran is where things get complicated. It's allied with Russia while both states are allied with Assad, whom Hillary Clinton, John Kerry, and Barack Obama spent years trying to topple. Trump opposes the 2015 Iran accord but wants to make nice with Putin, while liberals back the agreement while at the same time viewing the Russian president as the devil incarnate even though he helped negotiate it. Their neocon allies are meanwhile hostile to all three.

Chuck Schumer, leader of the glorious anti-Trump #Resistance in the Senate, voted against the Iran agreement, as did fellow New York Democrat Eliot L. Engel in the House. William Kristol, leader of the never-Trump neocons, campaigned against it along with fellow neocon Trump-basher Max Boot.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 1   Well Said 1  
Rate It | View Ratings

Daniel Lazare Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Freelance journalist and author of three books: The Frozen Republic (Harcourt, 1996); The Velvet Coup (Verso, 2001) and America's Undeclared War (Harcourt 2001).


Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

The Mueller Indictments: The Day the Music Died

When Washington Cheered the Jihadists

How Saudi/Gulf Money Fuels Terror

The Scheme to Take Down Trump

Obama Climbing into Bed with Al-Qaeda

Hillary Clinton: Candidate of War