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The American Fascist

By   Follow Me on Twitter     Message Robert B. Reich       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     Permalink    (# of views)   3 comments

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Reprinted from Robert Reich Blog

Donald Trump
Donald Trump
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I've been reluctant to use the "f" word to describe Donald Trump because it's especially harsh, and it's too often used carelessly.

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But Trump has finally reached a point where parallels between his presidential campaign and the fascists of the first half of the 20th century -- lurid figures such as Benito Mussolini, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Oswald Mosley, and Francisco Franco -- are too evident to overlook.

It's not just that Trump recently quoted Mussolini (he now calls that tweet inadvertent) or that he's begun inviting followers at his rallies to raise their right hands in a manner chillingly similar to the Nazi "Heil" salute (he dismisses such comparison as "ridiculous.")

The parallels go deeper.

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As did the early twentieth-century fascists, Trump is focusing his campaign on the angers of white working people who have been losing economic ground for years, and who are easy prey for demagogues seeking to build their own power by scapegoating others.

Trump's electoral gains have been largest in counties with lower than average incomes, and among those who report their personal finances have worsened. As the Washington Post's Jeff Guo has pointed out, Trump performs best in places where middle-aged whites are dying the fastest.

The economic stresses almost a century ago that culminated in the Great Depression were far worse than most of Trump's followers have experienced, but they've suffered something that in some respects is more painful -- failed expectations.

Many grew up during the 1950s and 1960s, during a postwar prosperity that lifted all boats. That prosperity gave their parents a better life. Trump's followers naturally expected that they and their children would also experience economic gains. They have not.

Add fears and uncertainties about terrorists who may be living among us, or may want to sneak through our borders, and this vulnerability and powerlessness is magnified.

Trump's incendiary verbal attacks on Mexican immigrants and Muslims -- even his reluctance to distance himself from David Duke and the Ku Klux Klan -- follow the older fascist script.

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That older generation of fascists didn't bother with policy prescriptions or logical argument, either. They presented themselves as strongmen whose personal power would remedy all ills.

They created around themselves cults of personality in which they took on the trappings of strength, confidence, and invulnerability -- all of which served as substitutes for rational argument or thought.

Trump's entire campaign similarly revolves around his assumed strength and confidence. He tells his followers not to worry; he'll take care of them. "If you get laid off ... I still want your vote," he told workers in Michigan last week. "I'll get you a new job; don't worry about it."

The old fascists intimidated and threatened opponents. Trump is not above a similar strategy. To take one example, he recently tweeted that Chicago's Ricketts family, now spending money to defeat him, "better be careful, they have a lot to hide."

The old fascists incited violence. Trump has not done so explicitly but Trump supporters have attacked Muslims, the homeless, and African-Americans -- and Trump has all but excused their behavior.

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Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new film, "Inequality for All," to be released September 27. He blogs at www.robertreich.org.

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