Power of Story
Send a Tweet        
- Advertisement -

Share on Google Plus 1 Share on Twitter 1 Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend (2 Shares)  

Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites (# of views)   20 comments
OpEdNews Op Eds

The 10 Steps to Impeach a President

By       Message Robert B. Reich     Permalink
      (Page 1 of 2 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 2   Well Said 2   Funny 2  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H2 7/15/17

Author 47089
Become a Fan
  (120 fans)

From flickr.com: 2017.02.25 Rally in Support of Affordable Care Act #ACA Washington, DC USA 01295 {MID-141842}
2017.02.25 Rally in Support of Affordable Care Act #ACA Washington, DC USA 01295
(Image by tedeytan)
  Permission   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -

From Robert Reich Blog

It won't be easy to impeach Donald Trump. No president in American history has ever been convicted on articles of impeachment. Only two presidents so far have been impeached by the House and had that impeachment go to the Senate for trial. The first was Andrew Johnson, in 1868, when the Senate came one vote short of convicting him. The next was 131 years later, in 1999, when Bill Clinton's impeachment went to the Senate. Fifty Senators voted to convict Clinton, 17 votes short of what was needed.

What about Richard Nixon? He resigned early in this process, before the House had even voted on articles of impeachment. And then his successor, who had been his vice president, Gerald Ford, gave Nixon a full and unconditional pardon for any crimes he might have committed against the United States while president.

This isn't to say Trump couldn't or won't be impeached. Only that it's a long and drawn-out process.

- Advertisement -

It all revolves around Article I, Sections 2 and 3 of the Constitution, and rules in the House and the Senate implementing those provisions.

Step 1. It starts in the House Judiciary Committee, when a majority of the members vote in favor of what's called an "inquiry of impeachment" resolution.

Step 2. That resolution goes to the full House of Representatives where a majority has to vote in favor. And then votes to authorize and fund a full investigation by the Judiciary Committee into whether sufficient grounds exist for impeachment.

- Advertisement -

Step 3. The House Judiciary Committee investigates. That investigation doesn't have to be from scratch. It can rely on data and conclusions of other investigations undertaken by, say, the FBI.

Step 4: A majority of the Judiciary Committee members decides there are sufficient grounds for impeachment, and the Committee issues a "Resolution of Impeachment," setting forth specific allegations of misconduct in one or more articles of impeachment.

Step 5: The full House then considers that Resolution and votes in favor of it -- as a whole or on each article separately. The full House isn't bound by the Committee's work. The House may vote to impeach even if the Committee doesn't recommend impeachment.

Step 6: The matter then goes to the Senate for a trial. The House's Resolution of Impeachment becomes in effect the charges in this trial.

Step 7: The Senate issues a summons to the president, who is now effectively the defendant, informing him of the charges and the date by which he has to answer them. If the president chooses not to answer or appear, it's as if he entered a "not guilty" plea.

Step 8 is the trial in the Senate. In that trial, those who are representing the House -- that is, the prosecution -- and counsel for the president, both make opening arguments. They then introduce evidence and put on witnesses as in any trial. Witnesses are subject to examination and cross-examination. The trial is presided over by the chief justice of the Supreme Court -- who has the authority to rule on evidentiary questions or may put such questions to a vote of the Senate. The House managers and counsel for the president then make closing arguments.

- Advertisement -

Step 9: The Senate meets in closed session to deliberate.

Step 10: The Senate returns in open session to vote on whether to convict the president on the articles of impeachment. Conviction requires a two-thirds vote by the Senate. Conviction on one or more articles of impeachment results in removal from office. Such a conviction also disqualifies the now former president from holding any other public office. And it doesn't bar additional legal proceedings against that former president, and punishment.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 2   Well Said 2   Funny 2  
View Ratings | Rate It

http://robertreich.org/

Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new film, "Inequality for All," to be released September 27. He blogs at www.robertreich.org.


Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon



Go To Commenting
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
- Advertisement -

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

The Republican's Big Lies About Jobs (And Why Obama Must Repudiate Them)

Paul Ryan Still Doesn't Get It

What Mitt Romney Really Represents

What to Do About Disloyal Corporations

The Gas Wars

The Minimum Wage, Guns, Healthcare, and the Meaning of a Decent Society