Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 15 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Positive News    H3'ed 11/25/21

Thanksgiving is Awesome; In reply to the haters

By       (Page 1 of 2 pages)   7 comments
Become a Premium Member Would you like to know how many people have read this article? Or how reputable the author is? Simply sign up for a Advocate premium membership and you'll automatically see this data on every article. Plus a lot more, too.
Author 2354
Message Matt Taibbi

Happy holiday, everyone


Pirate Music - Swashbuckling Adventure Music by Matti Paalanen Here is my latest celtic music video: .Celtic music for sleep - Frozen Winter | One hour of celtic music . youtube.com/watch? v=VOWBM7Bid38 ...
(Image by YouTube, Channel: Celestial Aeon Project celtic music & epic music)
  Details   DMCA

Sure, the founders were pirates, but even that's a little bit funny

Thanksgiving Day is here, and as is the fashion, it's taking a beating. "What is Thanksgiving to Indigenous People? 'A Day of Mourning,'" writes the onetime daily Bible of American mass culture, USA Today. The Washington Post fused a clickhole headline format with white guilt to create, "This tribe helped the Pilgrims survive for their first Thanksgiving. They still regret it 400 years later." Even the pundits who didn't rummage in the past in search of reasons for Americans to flog themselves this week found some in the future, a la the Post's climate-change take on Turkey Day menus:"What's on the Thanksgiving table in a hotter, drier world?"

MSNBC meanwhile kept us all festive by reminding us, with regard to the now-infamous Pilgrims, that "Instead of bringing stuffing and biscuits, those settlers brought genocide and violence":

MSNBC @MSNBC

"Instead of bringing stuffing and biscuits, those settlers brought genocide and violence," Gyasi Ross says about the history of American Thanksgiving. "That genocide and violence is still on the menu."

Where's all this headed? In the space of a generation America has gone from being a country brimming with undeserved over-confidence, to one whose intellectual culture has turned into an agonizing, apparently interminable run of performative self-flagellation.

Whether or not to enjoy Thanksgiving is not the hard part of the American citizen's test. Thanksgiving is awesome. Everything about it, from the mashed potatoes to the demented relatives to the pumpkin pies to the farts, is top-drawer holiday enjoyment. The only logical complaint about modern Thanksgiving involves forcing the poor Detroit Lions to play a marquee role every year. I think we can all agree that whole situation is a net minus, especially for them, no matter how funny the first fifteen minutes of those games usually are.

But the historical self-mortification has gotten out of hand. American exceptionalism used to mean 300 million yahoos being so convinced they were a unique force for good in the world that history before 1776 was irrelevant. We're now living through the moronic inverse: America is such a unique evil, we're told, so much the standard-bearer for the oppression of innocent peoples everywhere, that human suffering before 1776 is hardly worth mentioning. Or before 1492, as it were, since a lot of the current fashion stems from our pseudo-intellectual class being unable suddenly to handle the revelations of one decades-old book.

In the opening pages of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, we read the log of Christopher Columbus, who recounts the first meeting of Europeans with the native Arawaks of the Bahamas:

They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it and cut themselves out of ignorance" With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.

Zinn's Columbus is a genocidal monster who not only massacred natives from Hispaniola to Haiti, and sold women and children by the thousands for "sex and labor," but was so personally petty that he stole the reward of the poor sailor on his own ship who spotted land first, by claiming the feat himself. It's hard to read Zinn's account, which includes horrifying details like Indians murdering their own children to spare them the tortures of life under Spaniards, and not have a second thought or ten about the legend of the "discovery of America."

I found A People's History a fascinating and enjoyable read when I first read it in college, but that was when it was a ballsy, quasi-forbidden counterfactual to official narrative, not anyone's idea of the actual "History of the United States." The national idea of historical reflection back then was Forrest Gump, literally a two-hour shrug. Because of that, the book made sense then. Decades later, in the middle of a reverse cultural mania that devours it as gospel, Zinn's book reads like the rantings of a mental patient.

After he finishes his tale of Columbus's rampage through sinless indigenous cultures, Zinn contrasts it with the fables Americans of the time were all taught in school, in which "there is no bloodshed" upon the his arrival. He goes on to torch as an example the work of Harvard historian Samuel Eliot Morrison, whose Christopher Columbus, Mariner contains only a passing reference to the "cruel policy initiated by Columbus" [that] resulted in complete genocide."

Next Page  1  |  2

(Note: You can view every article as one long page if you sign up as an Advocate Member, or higher).

 

Rate It | View Ratings

Matt Taibbi Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Matt Taibbi is a reporter for Rolling Stone magazine.
Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Wall Street's Bailout Hustle

Thanksgiving is Awesome; In reply to the haters

Comments Image Post Article Comment and Rate This Article

These discussions are not moderated. We rely on users to police themselves, and flag inappropriate comments and behavior. In accordance with our Guidelines and Policies, we reserve the right to remove any post at any time for any reason, and will restrict access of registered users who repeatedly violate our terms.

  • OpEdNews welcomes lively, CIVIL discourse. Personal attacks and/or hate speech are not tolerated and may result in banning.
  • Comments should relate to the content above. Irrelevant, off-topic comments are a distraction, and will be removed.
  • By submitting this comment, you agree to all OpEdNews rules, guidelines and policies.
          

Comment Here:   


You can enter 2000 characters.
Become a Premium Member Would you like to be able to enter longer comments? You can enter 10,000 characters with Leader Membership. Simply sign up for your Premium Membership and you can say much more. Plus you'll be able to do a lot more, too.

Please login or register. Afterwards, your comment will be published.
 

Username
Password
Show Password

Forgot your password? Click here and we will send an email to the address you used when you registered.
First Name
Last Name

I am at least 16 years of age
(make sure username & password are filled in. Note that username must be an email address.)

6 people are discussing this page, with 7 comments  Post Comment


Meryl Ann Butler

Become a Fan Follow Me on Twitter (Member since Jun 5, 2006), 81 fans, 747 articles, 2147 quicklinks, 6572 comments, 8 diaries (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

Well, we can't change what was done in the past, but I hope that by being cognizant of it, we can create a better future. And that often happens when "undeserved over-confidence" balances itself out with some self-flagellation as the pendulum swings, before getting to the point of balance. But just because that is the natural progression of things doesn't mean we shouldn't party when we can in the meantime!

Thanks for the music!

Submitted on Thursday, Nov 25, 2021 at 2:49:38 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (1+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Michael Dewey

Become a Fan
Author 11470
Follow Me on Twitter (Member since Feb 15, 2008), 18 fans, 24 articles, 7 quicklinks, 4512 comments, 17 diaries (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)

"When shall it be said in any country of the world, my poor are happy; neither ignorance nor distress is to be found among them; my jails are empty of prisoners, my streets of beggars; the aged are not in want, the taxes are not oppressive...when these things can be said, then may that country boast of its constitution and government."~ Thomas Paine"
       -- Tom Paine

Facebook Page Twitter Page Linked In Page Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

Have it book marker for future read. Got music playing of video.

We got a 21st Century Cyber-Space Cowboy Convoy going for a 21st Century Group W Bench we slow done what's broken to get a Core of why too many towns and cities are broke. Antwerpen was feeling 5-1 Hit on their money before Euro forced down throats. They do pay many Social Needs Through Higher SS Tax, and Flemish still call it The Promised Land. Public City Banks at the Post Office funding get back what they claim to have borrowed. Picking up all Misfits better then broke slime balls, know my share around Leoburg about to clean out Coke Supplies.

Times like these will pass,,, for better slower days to come.

Group W Bench
Group W Bench
(Image by Michael Dewey)
Details DMCA

First video posted to my Yoko Marie who joy of lives in ashes. Dank Jewel only word Dutch Marie and Flemish ever cared to learn and were for WW 1 and 2, wondering if we start the 3rd.

Submitted on Thursday, Nov 25, 2021 at 10:51:50 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

John Hawkins

Become a Fan
Author 517692
Follow Me on Twitter (Member since Aug 11, 2020), 5 fans, 471 articles, 7 quicklinks, 502 comments, 2 diaries (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)

"All, all except Phineas, constructed at infinite cost to themselves this Maginot Line against this enemy they thought they saw across the frontier, this enemy that never attacked that way--if he ever attacked at all. If indeed he was the enemy."
       -- John Knowles

Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter Page Linked In Page Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

The Pilgrims came from Puritan stock in England. They almost closed down the Globe Theatre because of the groundling problem they perceived, swearing and drinking and lewdity. That men would lower themselves to play Ophelia and Cleopatra didn't go down well, either. They may have supplied the inflammatory material for the cannon fired that set the Globe ablaze during Henry VIII, who had too many wives for their tastes. Even after they got chased out England to Holland, they got in trouble with their PC ways, calling women in Amsterdam dikes, although they did take a liking to Heineken beer. When they started making fun of the windmills, the Dutch told them Ixnay, Bad Hombres. They went to the New World, as Pilgrims, because they had to. It wasn't like the Indigenous in Native America were happy to see them, neither, no how, especially Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg. Of course, after they scalped him, his name got shortened to Goggago, in fond remembrance of the waterboarding they enjoyed before his beheading.

Today, I read that Christopher Columbus wasn't even Italian, and that his real name was Cristobol Colon, some Portuguese guy. To compound my confusion, last year I read a book, The Age of Intoxication, that claimed CC was so high (or low) on opium that he thought all the places he went to held Indians. Everywhere he went, he goes, "Hihowareya." If you've ever "enjoyed" an opium dream, you can probably imagine how terrified he must have been, unable to wake up. The fuckin crew had him as a write-off pretty early in the voyage. In fact, CC's ship came perilously close to becoming an opium parlor on the high seas.

So, Matt, I subscribe to your Substack posts, but here I think you are way off. Why don't you go flagellate yourself.

Submitted on Friday, Nov 26, 2021 at 1:55:06 AM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (1+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

John Zwiebel

Become a Fan
Author 509185
(Member since Jun 19, 2017), 3 fans, 3 articles, 8 quicklinks, 1128 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

This article has me so confused.

I keep reading it (and the many comments, some intelligent others not so much) over and over again but in the end it just sounds schizophrenic.

Having Turkey Dinner with family and friends is so disconnected from Zinn's version of American History, it makes no sense. We are responsible for changing the direction our nation is going, not dwelling on the failures of its past.

To harness all the divergent directions each of us is going we need to acknowledge the past and learn from it. Do we want to get along with one another, to create an equable society, or do we want to continue to allow the sins of the past to control our future?

Yes, of course, there is nuance. Remedying one sin by committing another doesn't accomplish much other than perpetuation of the kind of society many claim they want to see fade away. But not the Oligarchy, not our political leadership that has rigged so many elections over the last few decades.

I can agree with Taibbi when he says:

But the historical self-mortification has gotten out of hand.

Who is responsible for this? Not Zinn. He didn't start the story-line about America being the epitome of evil. Taibbi even points out that it is the MSM that is spreading reminding us. The question is why?

Would Taibbi want us to return to the days of Reagan's "shining city on a hill" where we cover up our Vietnam mistakes and forget about them by shooting down Libyan fighter planes and invading Grenada to avoid facing the fiasco of the 200+ Marines killed in Beruit on a mission with no purpose. One that Fox News helped the instigators solely blame on Reagan after his Alzheimers became too obvious to ignore.

I just don't get Taibbi's point.

Submitted on Friday, Nov 26, 2021 at 10:24:42 AM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Lois Gagnon

Become a Fan
Author 61784
(Member since Mar 21, 2011), 41 fans, 1 articles, 15 quicklinks, 5870 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

Like others here, I usually agree with Matt, but think he's jumped the shark with this one. The backlash to our genocidal ways is finally hitting home and is making some people angry to have their party of gluttony disrupted by inconvenient truths.


He charges the liberal media for pushing the victim narrative around Thanksgiving. No doubt they are using this controversy for reasons having nothing to do with restorative justice for Native Americans despite the phony narrative. That doesn't negate the need to come to terms with our past in order to stop the continuation of lethal colonialist policies that continue to this day.

Genocide is the original cancel culture. Pointing that out seems to be sticking in some people's craw.

Submitted on Friday, Nov 26, 2021 at 2:28:19 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Mary Elizabeth

Become a Fan
Author 518379
(Member since Sep 27, 2020), 33 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

Agree with Taibbi. The haters are unbalanced. Turkey dinner with dressing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie? What's not to like? Gratitude?

I do not hate the flagellant population. If you've lived in any large city, you probably noticed the open S&M population. Some wound up in positions of authority (quite possibly your supervisor or politician, alas). San Francisco's Leather Walk is one piece of evidence. If you look around with an open mind you will probably see much more. Pelosi on her old aching knees? That 2020 photo of the BLM kneeling FBI agents? The first impression that crossed my mind: these people are kinky, aren't they?

If you happen to have that bent, find your willing adult partner(s) but don't push aside civility to impose your pained and painful attentions on the unwilling. Go have your fun, but you don't get to wreck the fun for everyone else. It's especially mean to try to ruin Thanksgiving (or other cherished holidays), and the response is likely to be rude in return.

Hope Matt Taibbi and everyone else enjoyed a splendid Thanksgiving in great company

Submitted on Friday, Nov 26, 2021 at 4:45:19 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Mary Elizabeth

Become a Fan
Author 518379
(Member since Sep 27, 2020), 33 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

Of Puritans and Pilgrims, like other humans they were flawed but also had amazing qualities and accomplishments.

For an interesting history of deafness and American Sign Language, check out the history of the Pilgrim colonies around Martha's Vineyard/ Cape Cod: "Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language" by Nora Ellen Groce and John Whiting.

There was a high level of hereditary deafness in this community. In some families as many as one child in five was deaf. These Puritans dealt with deafness in a very straightforward, practical way, developing the predecessor to ASL, and went about their trade or business regardless of deafness, no problem..

Submitted on Friday, Nov 26, 2021 at 5:06:37 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

 
Want to post your own comment on this Article? Post Comment