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OpEdNews Op Eds    H3'ed 1/5/16

Terrorism, US Politics, and the US Media

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Reprinted from The Greanville Post


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First question: what is terrorism? One definition is that it is an armed technique, usually used again non-combatants, in a conventional or non-conventional war situation. (Well yes, I did make that one up.)

One dictionary definition is: "1. the use of violence and threats to intimidate or coerce, especially for political purposes; 2. the state of fear and submission produced by terrorism or terrorization; 3. a terroristic method of governing or of resisting a government." Another is: "the use of violent acts to frighten the people in an area as a way of trying to achieve a political goal; the systematic use of terror especially as a means of coercion."

But then t he good old Wikipedia tells us that: "There is neither an academic nor an accurate legal consensus regarding the definition of terrorism. [1][2] Various legal systems and government agencies use different definitions. Moreover, governments have been reluctant to formulate an agreed upon, legally binding definition. These difficulties arise from the fact that the term is politically and emotionally charged."[3]

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One thing that all of these definitions have in common is that they describe a tactic, or at best a strategy, of war. Nevertheless, since the time of President Bush (who described the 9/11 disaster as a "terrorist attack" before anyone had the foggiest notion who/what was responsible), we have somehow had the "War on Terror" (which for the military-industrial complexes involved in fighting it has the advantage of being a Permanent War).

It just so happens that the "War on Terror," was declared by Bush, and, as Eugene Robinson noted, continued under Obama without a definition of the term having ever been provided. However, as Robinson also said, paraphrasing an unknown U.S. general, declaring a "war on terror" is like declaring a war on "flanking maneuvers." [Black pundit Eugene Robinson was for a long time a faithful supporter of Obama. That has changed some, but certainly not radically. -- Ed.]

Except that in the United States, acts that can be described as "terroristic" using any of the definitions quoted above, such as "the use of violence and threats to intimidate or coerce, especially for political purposes," or "the use of violent acts to frighten the people in an area as a way of trying to achieve a political goal" or any others that one could think of for that matter, have one very peculiar characteristic. That is, in this day-and-age, flanking maneuvers or no, according to most U.S. politicians (and all Repub. politicians) and most of the U.S. media (most especially what is referred to as the "mainstream media"), for the most part to be labelled as "terrorism" a violent act carried out against civilians it has to have been done, or made to appear to have been done by Muslims.

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And so, since "San Bernardino," (an absolute horror to be sure) we have been hearing about it and its apparent perpetrators virtually 24/7. Most especially we are hearing about their "radicalization" and how the Pakistani woman got into the country. (We don't hear so much about how they happened to be able to freely get themselves, or through a friend, military-style assault rifles, but of course we know the reason for that.) That word, "radicalization," as though it were some kind of secret process conducted by witches (think "Macbeth"), is repeated over-and-over again, the implication being that it must be Muslims who are the potential subjects for it, and that must be found out. [A similar attack on "radicals" and "radicalisation" is taking place in Britain; if anything it is more advanced and acerbic than in America. -- Eds.]

But have you ever heard of the 2009 mass killing at an adult immigrant resource center in Binghamton, NY? Well, you may have, but I had to be reminded of it by a recent column on the Huffington Post. Of course, they were all foreign nationals, but I wonder if the killer had become "radicalized" against such folk. I don't think that we'll ever find out.

And then what about the "massacre [that] took place at the Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where 40-year-old Wade Michael Page fatally shot six people and wounded four others. [3][4] ... Page was an American white supremacist and United States Army veteran..." I can't recall much of an investigation about how this known white supremacist got radicalized. And oh by the way, Page thought that he was murdering Muslims. Sikh's aren't.

One does have to wonder why we don't hear too much about Robert Dear, who murdered three people at the Planned Parenthood Clinic in Colorado Springs and how he got "radicalized." Lots of people think that abortion is murder (after all, the Repubs. and their echo chambers at Fox"News" and right-wing talk radio spew that stuff 24/7). But fortunately not-too-many are "radicalized" enough to go commit murder. We do hear some about Sandy Hook, but that was not "terrorism," mind you, because it was committed by a clearly mentally ill young man who had a mentally ill mother for an accomplice (and they both happened to be white).


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And then we come to the outlier rancher Cliven Bundy and his gang of "militia-men" who threatened to murder Federal law enforcement officials if they attempted to stop him from breaking the law on grazing his cattle on public lands. How did such folks "get radicalized?" And when Dylann Roof, known for his open association with white "The Confederacy Will Rise Again" hate groups (of which there are many not only in the South but other parts of the country as well), slaughters eight churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina (the capital of the first of what became the Confederate States of America) we don't hear the media going on and on about "how was he radicalized?"

But heck, we would be getting much too close to home (literally). After all, the Southern Policy Law Center has identified about 1,600 armed and dangerous right-wing "militias/hateist/domestic terrorist groups." But when early in the Obama Administration the Department of Homeland Security announced that it was going to launch an investigation into domestic organizations posing potential terrorist threats the screams and outrage from the supposedly "anti-terror" Republicans in the Congress brought that one to halt quickly. And we could go on.

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Steven Jonas, MD, MPH, MS is a Professor Emeritus of Preventive Medicine at StonyBrookMedicine (NY) and author/co-author/editor/co-editor of over 35 books. In addition to his position on OpEdNews as a "Trusted Author," he is a Senior Editor, (more...)
 
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