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OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 4/19/21

Russia or China -- Is Biden Right in Targeting Russia?

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Message Arshad M Khan

No one can disagree with President Joe Biden when he wants to overhaul infrastructure -- although a single-minded concentration on one aspect is likely to be longer-lasting and a legacy. Consider, for example, a high-speed rail link between New York and Los Angeles, True high-speed, that is, and truly modern like the new lines in China with a design speed up to 350 km/h (220 mph), or preferably higher by the time the rails are constructed in the US. It would make overnight coast-to-coast (3,000 miles) railroad trips a reality.

What is more difficult to fathom is Biden's foreign policy. He appears to have identified Russia as an adversary or worse, starting with calling Vladimir Putin a killer and exposing several Russian companies that possibly support its intelligence services. Do American companies ever provide cover for the CIA? That is the obvious question coming to mind with an obvious answer. Have western intelligence services including the CIA ever carried out assassinations? If so, would the US president be called a killer?


At the same time, Russia is not the country with a stated goal of becoming the world's leader in its economy, technology and military. No, that's China. Russia only wants closer ties with the west but is being driven into the arms of China.


Given China's stated goals and its progress towards them, it is transparent that its aims require the displacement of the US from its leadership position. Any prospect of thwarting China's ambitions would impel the US to cordon the country to some extent or at the very least attempt to challenge its influence. Instead, China is signing treaties with neighbors. It is in Iran and it announced that it might send its own troops to Afghanistan to maintain its "peace" after the US departs. Afghanistan, by the way, is rich in minerals and rare-earth elements.


So far Mr. Biden's foreign-policy initiatives appear tactical with a kind of tit-for-tat approach that is absent a coordinated (with allies) strategic plan to prepare the US for a confrontation politically and economically -- not militarily, although as the US ramps up pressure, a skirmish here and there on the high seas could be a possibility.


A string of Chinese bases now ring the Persian Gulf extending west to East Africa and east along the Iran and Pakistan coast to Sri Lanka, across to Burma and then south to the western end of Indonesia. The recent treaty with Russia allows convenient Eurasian access while the new closeness with Iran permits an overland route to its oil riches. East of Iran is Pakistan, which is a Chinese client state of long standing and where it has built the Gwadar port.


Given the circumstances, the US is obliged to reassess Iran from a geostrategic perspective but also Pakistan, a country that has been on the frontlines of the Afghan war since the beginning. Pakistan is also a key to long-term peace in Afghanistan as its own Pashtun population is connected to Pashtuns there through family ties and a traditionally porous border. They also command a plurality as the largest ethnic group in Afghanistan.


Further east China is increasing its influence in Sri Lanka, and is by far Burma's largest trading partner. The recent coup in Burma is its own story and an oft-reported tale in that country without noting China's silence.


Despite the local politics, the US can ill afford to surrender such a vast region to China without counter moves to ensure some freedom of movement within China's tight embrace

 

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Arshad M Khan is a former Professor. Educated at King's College London, Oklahoma State University and the University of Chicago, he has a multidisciplinary background that has frequently informed his research. He was elected a Fellow of the (more...)
 
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"the US can ill afford to surrender such a vast region to China without counter moves to ensure some freedom of movement within China's tight embrace" Neither Russia nor China should be in the U.S. military's gunsights. If the U.S. wishes to compete with Russia and China it needs to reform itself first (financialization, racism, democratic reality) before it should continue to be a blowhard about its exceptionalism and indispensability and its supposed desire for freedom and liberty around the world. Smedley Butler had it right - the military is there to support the corporations and the big money makers, always has, always will.

Submitted on Tuesday, Apr 20, 2021 at 10:46:32 PM

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