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Russia Impinges on Israeli "Right" to Bomb Iran

By       Message Ray McGovern       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     Permalink

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Reprinted from Consortium News

The front page of the neocon flagship Washington Post on Tuesday warned that the Russians have decided, despite U.S. objections, "to send an advanced air-defense system to Iran ... potentially altering the strategic balance in the Middle East."

So, at least, says the lede of an article entitled "Putin lifts 5-year hold on missile sale to Iran" by Karoun Demirjian, whose editors apparently took it upon themselves to sex up the first paragraph, which was not at all supported by the rest of her story which was factual and fair -- balanced, even.

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Not only did Demirjian include much of Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov's
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explanation
of Moscow's decision to end its self-imposed restriction on the delivery of S-300 surface-to-air missiles to Iran, but she mentioned Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's umpteenth warning on Monday about "the prospect of airstrikes to destroy or hinder Tehran's nuclear program."

Lavrov noted that United Nations resolutions "did not impose any restrictions on providing air defense weapons to Iran" and described the "separate Russian free-will embargo" as "irrelevant" in the light of the "meaningful progress" achieved by the negotiated framework deal of April 2 in which Iran accepted unprecedented constraints on its nuclear program to show that it was intended for peaceful purposes only.

The Russian Foreign Minister emphasized that the S-300 is a "completely defensive weapon [that] will not endanger the security of any state in the region, certainly including Israel." Pointing to "the extremely tense situation in the region around Iran, he said modern air-defense systems are vitally important for that country." Lavrov added that by freezing the S-300 contract for five years, Russia also had lost a lot of money. (The deal is said to be worth $800 million.)

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Predictably, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton told Fox News that the air-defense system would be a "game-changer" for Israel regarding air strikes. According to Bolton, once the system is in place, only stealth bombers would be able to penetrate Iranian space, and only the U.S. has those and was not likely to use them.

The U.S. media also highlighted comments by popular go-to retired Air Force three-star General David A. Deptula, who served as Air Force deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance until he retired in 2010 to make some real money. Deptula called delivering the S-300 system to Iran "significant, as it complicates the calculus for planning any military action involving air strikes."

It strikes me as a bit strange that the media likes to feature retired generals like Deptula, whose reputations for integrity are not the best. Deptula has been temporarily barred from doing business with the government after what Air Force Deputy General Counsel Randy Grandon described as "particularly egregious" breaches of post-employment rules. He remains, however, a media favorite.

Adding to his woes, Deptula was also caught with 125 classified documents on his personal laptop -- including 10 labeled "Secret," 14 labeled "Top Secret" and one with the high protection of "Secret, Compartmented Information." Deptula pleaded ignorance and was let off -- further proof that different standards apply to generals like Deptula and David Petraeus.

A More Subdued Tone

The S-300 announcement hit as Secretary of State John Kerry was testifying on Capitol Hill about the framework deal on Iran's nuclear program. Speaking later to Fox News, Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Illinois, professed shock that Kerry did not seem more upset. According to Kinzinger, Kerry actually said, "You have to understand Iran's perspective."

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And in keeping with Kerry's tone of sang-froid, State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf, referring to the S-300 deal, said, "We see this as separate from the negotiations [regarding Iran's nuclear program], and we don't think this will have an impact on our unity."

White House press secretary Josh Earnest took the S-300 announcement with his customary, studied earnestness. Referring not only to the decision to deliver the S-300s but also to reports of a $20 billion barter deal that would involve Russia buying 500,000 barrels of oil a day in return for Russian grain, equipment and construction materials, Earnest referred to "potential sanctions concerns" and said the U.S. would "evaluate these two proposals moving forward," adding that the U.S. has been in direct touch with Russia to make sure the Russians understand -- and they do -- the potential concerns that we have."

With respect to the various sanctions against Iran, I believe this nonchalant tone can be seen largely as whistling in the dark. With the S-300 and the barter deals, Russia is putting a huge dent in the sanctions regimes. From now on, money is likely to call the shots, as competitors vie for various slices of the Iranian -- and the Russian -- pie. Whether or not there is a final agreement by the end of June on the Iranian nuclear issue, Washington is not likely to be able to hold the line on sanctions and will become even more isolated if it persists in trying.

Worse still for the neocons and others who favor using sanctions to punish Russia over Ukraine, the lifting of sanctions against Iran may have a cascading effect. If, for example, the Ukrainian ceasefire holds more or less over the next months, it is possible that the $1.5 billion sale of two French-built Mistral-Class helicopter carrier ships to Russia, concluded four years ago, will go through.

The contract does not expire for two months and Russia's state arms exporter is trying to work out a compromise before taking France to court. Russian officials are expressing hope that a compromise can be reached within the time left.

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Ray McGovern works with Tell the Word, the publishing arm of the ecumenical Church of the Saviour in inner-city Washington. He was an Army infantry/intelligence officer and then a CIA analyst for 27 years, and is now on the Steering Group of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS). His (more...)
 

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