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OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 7/24/19

Our Veggie Gardens Won't Feed us in a Real Crisis

Author 513617
Message Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
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Republished from http://macskamoksha.com/

A haul from the Author's urban farming operation in Portland
A haul from the Author's urban farming operation in Portland
(Image by macskamoksh)
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Massive flooding and heavier than normal precipitation across the US Midwest this year delayed or entirely prevented the planting of many crops. The situation was sufficiently widespread that it was visible from space. The trouble isn't over yet: Hotter-than-normal temperatures predicted to follow could adversely affect corn pollination. Projections of lower yields have already stimulated higher prices in UN grain indexes and US ethanol. Additionally, the USDA is expecting harvests to be of inferior quality. Furthermore, the effects of this year could bleed into 2020; late planting leads to late harvesting which delays fall tilling, potentially until next spring, when who knows what Mother Nature will deliver.

Accuweather's characterization of this as a "one-of-a-kind growing season" is literally true only in terms of its exact circumstances (given increasingly chaotic events) but not in its intensity (which will surely be exceeded). Prudence would dictate that we heed this year's events as a warning and get serious about making preparations for worse years. Literal cycles of "feast or famine" have marked agriculture since its birth and sooner or later we will experience significant shortages here in the US, if not from the weather, than from war or lack of resources.

The Midwest floods and their possible repercussions for the food supply got some attention in the news (though not enough). One of the most common suggestions I saw on social media was: "Plant a garden!"

If only it were that simple.

I used to be a small-scale organic farmer so take it from me: totally feeding yourself from your own efforts is very, very challenging. Though some friends and I tried over multiple seasons, we never succeeded, or even came anywhere close.

First of all, consider what you eat. Yes, you. What do you eat at home? At work? When you go out? Okay, what percentage of that can be raised in the bioregion where you live? If you have trouble answering this question, don't feel bad. I would guess that the proportion of the US population with practical agricultural knowledge is lower than in any other society in history.

Looking at the subset of your current diet that can be grown in your area, is it enough to live off of? Is it well-balanced and does it provide enough calories? If not, what will you add to fill it out? This is purely an exercise of course, but there's the rough draft of the menu you're going to survive on. How will that work? I mean logistically?

Let's take carrots. They're popular, they're nutritious, and they can be grown all over the US without too much trouble. What's a year's worth of carrots look like? How many ten-foot rows would it take to produce that many? When are they best seeded? How much space, water and amendments do they require? What tools do you need? Are there diseases or insects to worry about and what's the best way of dealing with them? When do you pick them? How long will the harvest keep?

Now go through all those questions for everything else on your list.

Then add it up: all the space, hours, and equipment.

Does it look daunting? If it doesn't, you left something out.

Without going through all of the above, here's what you're probably not thinking of right now: The typical US American diet is only 10-20% fruits and veggies"like you might grow in your backyard"and the vast majority is made up of grains and proteins in one form or another.

What vegetable does nearly everyone grow in their home garden? Tomatoes. How do they eat them? Often enough, on a sandwich or in pasta. That's wheat or rice or some other grains. How many people have ever planted rice or wheat in their back yards?

Meat is also grains because that's what's fed to animals. This includes the majority of grass-fed cows, who are "finished" (fattened up) on grains on a feedlot prior to slaughter. So if you want meat in your home-grown diet, you'll need to plant for those mouths too. You might end up concluding that you don't need as much as you thought you did. (BTW, historic paleolithic diets were supplemented by hunting meat but were dependent on gathering roots, seeds, berries, etc.)

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Kollibri terre Sonnenblume's articles are republished from his website Macska Moksha.  He is a writer, photographer, tree hugger, animal lover, and dissident.



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