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OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 8/7/13

On Obama's cancellation of summit with Putin and extradition

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Source: The Guardian

The US frequently refuses extradition requests where, unlike with Snowden, it involves serious crimes and there is an extradition treaty


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Distant relations: President Obama looks grim as Russian president Vladimir Putin stares at the floor during a June 2013 bilateral press conference at the Lough Erne resort near Enniskillen in Northern Ireland

President Obama today canceled a long-scheduled summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin in part because the US president is upset that Russia defied his personal directive to hand over Edward Snowden despite the lack of an extradition treaty between the two nations. That means that US media outlets will spend the next 24 hours or so channeling the government's views (excuse the redundancy) by denouncing the Russian evil of refusing extradition. When doing so, very few, if any, establishment media accounts will mention any of these cases:


New York Times, February 28, 2007
:


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Washington Post, July 19, 2013:

The Guardian, September 9, 2012:


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[US refuses Bolivia's request to extradite its former CIA-supported president, Gonzalo Sa'nchez de Lozada, to stand trial on charges of genocide and other war crimes after de Lozada hires Democratic lobbyists to represent him]

El Paso Times, December 30, 2010:


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The US constantly refuses requests to extradite -- even where (unlike Russia) they have an extradition treaty with the requesting country and even where (unlike Snowden) the request involves actual, serious crimes, such as genocide, kidnapping, and terrorism. Maybe those facts should be part of whatever media commentary there is on Putin's refusal to extradite Snowden and Obama's rather extreme reaction to it.

Other matters

Former Bush-era CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden appeared on CNN this week and confirmed that our reporting on the NSA's X-Keyscore program was accurate, telling the nation that we should all be grateful for those capabilities.

NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen has a superb essay on the behavior of the US media in NSA stories.

Foreign Policy CEO and Editor David Rothkopf becomes the latest establishment figure to recognize, as he puts it in a quite good column: "I have myself been too slow to recognize that the benefits we have derived from Snowden's revelations substantially outweigh the costs associated with the breach."

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