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OpEdNews Op Eds    H4'ed 4/29/16

New Study Shows Mass Surveillance Breeds Meekness, Fear and Self-Censorship

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A newly published study from Oxford's Jon Penney provides empirical evidence for a key argument long made by privacy advocates: that the mere existence of a surveillance state breeds fear and conformity and stifles free expression. Reporting on the study, t he Washington Post this morning described this phenomenon: "If we think that authorities are watching our online actions, we might stop visiting certain websites or not say certain things just to avoid seeming suspicious."

The new study documents how, in the wake of the 2013 Snowden revelations (of which 87% of Americans were aware), there was "a 20 percent decline in page views on Wikipedia articles related to terrorism, including those that mentioned 'al-Qaeda,' 'car bomb' or 'Taliban.'" People were afraid to read articles about those topics because of fear that doing so would bring them under a cloud of suspicion. The dangers of that dynamic were expressed well by Penney: "If people are spooked or deterred from learning about important policy matters like terrorism and national security, this is a real threat to proper democratic debate."

As the Post explains, several other studies have also demonstrated how mass surveillance crushes free expression and free thought. A 2015 study examined Google search data and demonstrated that, post-Snowden, "users were less likely to search using search terms that they believed might get them in trouble with the US government" and that these "results suggest that there is a chilling effect on search behavior from government surveillance on the Internet."

The fear that causes self-censorship is well beyond the realm of theory. Ample evidence demonstrates that it's real -- and rational. A study from PEN America writers found that one in six writers had curbed their content out of fear of surveillance and showed that writers are "not only overwhelmingly worried about government surveillance, but are engaging in self-censorship as a result." Scholars in Europe have been accused of being terrorist supporters by virtue of possessing research materials on extremist groups, while British libraries refuse to house any material on the Taliban for fear of being prosecuted for material support for terrorism.

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Glenn Greenwald is one of three co-founding editors of The Intercept. He is a journalist, constitutional lawyer, and author of four New York Times best-selling books on politics and law. His most recent book, No Place (more...)
 

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