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OpEdNews Op Eds    H3'ed 6/28/19

Much safer to be a protester in Hong Kong than in France

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The differences in handling the recent protests in Hong Kong and the weekly demonstrations in France illuminate an enormous democratic deficit between Western "liberal democratic" societies and non-Western "socialist democratic" ones.

It has been amazing to see how quickly the Hong Kong government - which under the "one country, two systems" system largely means the Chinese government (Hong Kong is officially a part of China) - acquiesced to public opinion after just two days of moderately-violent protests.

I am shocked. This is not because I falsely perceive Hong Kong or China as "anti-democratic", but because every Saturday for months I have been dodging tear gas and rubber bullets in France. Hong Kong's government backed down after barely more than a week of regular protests in the capital, whereas France has been unwilling to appease a protest movement which has lasted over seven months.

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Almost immediately after protests turned violent, Hong Kong tabled the bill which proved so divisive, and their leader even apologised with the "utmost sincerity and humility". What a contrast to French President Emmanuel Macron: Not only has Macron never apologised, but he did not even utter the words "Yellow Vests" in public until late April. His Interior Ministry can only be counted on to routinely remind Yellow Vests that they have "no regrets" about how the protests have been officially handled.

Hong Kong police reported that 150 tear gas canisters, several rounds of rubber bullets, and 20 beanbag shots were fired during the only day of serious violence. Conversely, a damning annual report this month from French police reported that 19,000 rubber bullets were fired in 2018 (up 200% from 2017), as were 5,400 shock grenades (up 300%).

Two things are appalling here: Firstly, the French government fired - at their own people, mostly for protesting neoliberal austerity over 6,000 rubber bullets and 1,500 shock grenades in 2017. Shockingly violent protests were "normal" in France long before the Yellow Vests. Second: The Yellow Vests didn't arrive until the final 6 weeks of 2018 - therefore, the increases and totals for 2019 will likely be 4-5 times more than the already huge increases in 2018.

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The latest tallies count 72 injuries and 30 arrests in Hong Kong - it was shock over this heavy-handed policing which led to the government's intelligent move to restore order and democratic calm.

In France, the casualty figures are catastrophic: 850 serious injuries, 300 head injuries, 30 mutilations (loss of eye, hand or testicle). Someone passed out or vomiting is not counted as a "serious injury", but if we included those hurt by tear gas, water cannons and police truncheons the number of injuries would undoubtedly approach six figures, as astronomical as that figure sounds. As for arrests, France was at 9,000 on March 24, with nearly half receiving prison sentences. However, this count was announced before new, repressive orders were given to arrest democratic protesters even faster. After interviewing for PressTV one of the rare lawyers courageous enough to openly criticise a French legal system which is obviously not "independent", I estimate that over 2,000 Yellow Vests have already become political prisoners. More are obviously awaiting their trial, and more trials will obviously be convened.

Western mainstream media coverage of the two events is best described by a (modified) French saying: "one weight, two measures". Hong Kongers are "freedom fighters" against a "tyrannical" and "totalitarian" Chinese system, whereas Yellow Vesters are routinely slurred in the West as thugs, anti-Semites and insensible anarchists.

Western media has no problem printing the turnout numbers of organisers" when it comes to Hong Kong. The Yellow Vests' self-reported "Yellow Number", and the turnout count of a courageous, openly anti-Macron police union were routinely ignored by the Mainstream Media until mid-April (here is Wikipedia's tally of all three estimates, in French).

However, finally printing crowd counts from sources other than the (obviously self-interested) French Interior Ministry was clearly in keeping with the anti-Yellow Vest Mainstream Media: starting on March 23, France began deploying the military against French protesters, banning protests in urban centres nationwide (bans in rural areas began in early May), gave shocking orders for cops to "engage" (that is, "attack") protesters, and also gave orders to make arrests more rapidly. Therefore, the outdated count of 9,000 could easily be vastly higher.

All the repression achieved what it was obviously intended to: scare French anti-government protesters away. Weekly protests averaged a quarter million people from January 1 until mid-March (cop union estimates), but after the harsh repression was announced until today protests averaged only 65,000 brave souls.

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Western "independent" (and always-saintly) NGOs are no better than Western media: In a report released in late March, US-based Human Rights Watch had issued 131 articles, reports and statements on Venezuela - zero on France. The NGO is still totally silent on French repression.

Perhaps the most important question is: what are the protests about? On this issue there is also a huge difference: The protests in Hong Kong are over a law to extradite criminals, whereas in France the protests are over the criminal lack of public opinion in formulating public policy.

Those primarily threatened by Hong Kong's law are financial criminals, as the island's primary economic function is to serve as an England-dictated tax haven. This explains why "exposed" tycoons are now rushing their wealth out of Hong Kong. Perhaps the primary initial complaint was that the law would damage Hong Kong's "business climate", which is undoubtedly why Western media - so supportive of neo-imperialism and rapacious neoliberal business practices - was so very opposed to the bill and so very supportive of the protesters.

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Ramin Mazaheri is the chief correspondent in Paris for Press TV and has lived in France since 2009. He has been a daily newspaper reporter in the US, and has reported from Iran, Cuba, Egypt, Tunisia, South Korea and elsewhere. His work has (more...)
 

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How many people in the US even know about the Yellow Vests? Or the demonstrations in Haiti and Hondura?

Yet the msm broadcasts demonstrations in Hong Kong with glee.

Submitted on Friday, Jun 28, 2019 at 3:12:19 AM

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