Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 46 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Exclusive to OpEdNews:
Life Arts    H2'ed 4/28/19

Mike Pompeo's Cynicism vs. Marianne Williamson's Politics of Love

By       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     (# of views)   14 comments, 2 series
Author 47372
Follow Me on Twitter     Message Mike Rivage-Seul
Become a Fan
  (46 fans)

(Image by infowars.com)   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -
strong>

Readings for 2nd Sunday of Easter: Acts 5:12-16; Ps. 118: 2-4, 13-15, 22-24; Rev. 1: 9-11A, 12-13, 17-19; Jn. 20: 19-31.

By the time you see this, many of you will have been yet again outraged by the crude cynicism of Mike Pompeo, America's Secretary of State and former head of the CIA. This time, I'm referring to his embarrassing throw-away line following a speech at Texas A&M last week. Secretary Pompeo said:

". . . When I was a cadet, what's the first what's the cadet motto at West Point? You will not lie, cheat, or steal, or tolerate those who do. I was the CIA director. We lied, we cheated, we stole. (Laughter.) It's it was like we had entire training courses . . . (Applause.) It reminds you of the glory of the American experiment."

- Advertisement -

In this election season, Pompeo's arrogant disregard for the disastrous effects of the actions he described (in terms of governments overthrown, innocents slaughtered, and our own democracy discredited) offers an instructive foil to recommend the contrasting approach of Marianne Williamson, whose presidential campaign is based on what she terms a "politics of love." The contrast between Pompeo and Williamson is further illumined by the familiar story of Doubting Thomas which is the focus of today's liturgy of the word. It locates divine presence precisely in a victim of the imperial double-dealing and cruelty Pompeo finds so amusing and that Williamson finds abhorrent.

But before I get to that, please watch the secretary's remark for yourselves:

- Advertisement -

What I found noteworthy in what you just saw was not so much what Pompeo said. (Anyone who knows anything about the CIA would not find that surprising.) What I found amazing was the audience laughter and applause. Both suggested not only rejection of U.S. ideals, but of the faith Americans commonly claim. Pompeo's words absolutely contradict the Jewish tradition's Ten Commandments. The laughter and applause also suggested that Pompeo's audience recognized that lying, cheating, and stealing somehow have more power than the teachings of Jesus about the primacy of love and doing to others what we would have them do to us. (Let's face it: that's the underlying reservation many have about Marianne Williamson's candidacy as well.) Even more, the audience's approval cynically endorsed Pompeo's position that such actions constitute something glorious about Americans and their country!

I suppose the secretary would hasten to explain that we're living in a dangerous world, where enemies lie, cheat, and steal all the time; so, we must do the same. But just imagine if Vladimir Putin or Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro had uttered Pompeo's words! We'd never hear the end of it.

It's principled response to such cynicism that fuels Marianne Williamson's campaign for president. And in the light of today's Gospel reading, which endorses miracles over "realism," she should be taken seriously. More directly, and at a far deeper level than any of the other 20 (so far!) Democratic candidates, Williamson actually believes in a "Politics of Love," and says so openly.

In fact, Williamson is running on a platform that holds that there is no distinction between personal and public morality. As she points out, the world and our country have a long history of acknowledging that fact. Jesus himself embodied that teaching. So did Gandhi. Abolitionists were Quakers, as were many of the suffragettes. Martin Luther King was a Baptist preacher. The Berrigan brothers were Catholic priests; so was Thomas Merton. None saw any distinction between the personal and political.

However, it's not that Ms. Williamson is any less aware of our world's evils than Mr. Pompeo. She doesn't claim that the Judeo-Christian tradition invites anyone to ignore immorality and violence. Quite the contrary. As she points out, the entire Jewish tradition stems from rebellion precisely against the horror of slavery (in Moses' Egypt). And the Christian tradition is founded on the teachings of a prophet who was tortured and executed by one of history's most brutal empires. To ignore such evils, Williamson says, is not transcendence; it's denial.

And that thought brings us to today's Gospel reading. It's the familiar story of Doubting Thomas, whom in today's context we might call "Realistic Thomas." That's because the story is finally about Christ's call to recognize his own presence in the tortured victims of the kind of empire Pompeo's audience applauded. It's a parable told perhaps 90 years after Jesus' death to encourage believers who, unlike Thomas, had not seen the risen Christ, yet believed anyway. The story is about the early Christian community coming to realize the truth of Jesus' words, "Whatever is done to the least of my brethren, is done to me" (MT 25). Williamson recognizes all those truths. Evidently, Pompeo does not.

- Advertisement -

Recall the parable.

The disciples are in the Upper Room where they had so recently broken bread with Jesus the night before he died. But Thomas is not present. Then suddenly, the tortured one materializes there in their midst.

"Too bad Thomas is missing this," they must have said to one another.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 3   Well Said 2   Valuable 1  
Rate It | View Ratings

Mike Rivage-Seul Social Media Pages: Facebook Page       Twitter Page       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Retired in 2014, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 40 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program.Mike blogs (more...)
 

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Follow Me on Twitter     Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Sunday Homily: Pope Francis to Women: The Next Pope Should Be One of You!

The Case for and Intimate Relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene

"Cloud Atlas": A Film for the Ages (But perhaps not for ours)

Muhammad as Liberationist Prophet (Pt. 2 of 4 on Islam as Liberation Theology)

What You Don't Know About Cuba Tells You About YOUR Future

Sunday Homily: Pope Francis' New Song -- Seven Things You May Have Missed in 'The Joy of the Gospel'