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Media Complicity Is Key to Blacklisting Websites

By       Message Norman Solomon       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     Permalink

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We still don't have any sort of apology or retraction from the Washington Post for promoting "The List" -- the highly dangerous blacklist that got a huge boost from the newspaper's fawning coverage on November 24. The project of smearing 200 websites with one broad brush wouldn't have gotten far without the avid complicity of high-profile media outlets, starting with the Post.

On Thursday -- a week after the Post published its front-page news article hyping the blacklist that was put out by a group of unidentified people called PropOrNot -- I sent a petition statement to the newspaper's executive editor Martin Baron.

"Smearing is not reporting," the RootsAction petition says. "The Washington Post's recent descent into McCarthyism -- promoting anonymous and shoddy claims that a vast range of some 200 websites are all accomplices or tools of the Russian government -- violates basic journalistic standards and does real harm to democratic discourse in our country. We urge the Washington Post to prominently retract the article and apologize for publishing it."

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After mentioning that 6,000 people had signed the petition (the number has doubled since then), my email to Baron added: "If you skim through the comments that many of the signers added to the petition online, I think you might find them to be of interest. I wonder if you see a basis for dialogue on the issues raised by critics of the Post piece in question."

The reply came from the newspaper's vice president for public relations, Kristine Coratti Kelly, who thanked me "for reaching out to us" before presenting the Post's response, quoted here in full:

"The Post reported on the work of four separate sets of researchers, as well as independent experts, who have examined Russian attempts to influence American democracy. PropOrNot was one. The Post did not name any of the sites on PropOrNot's list of organizations that it said had -- wittingly or unwittingly -- published or echoed Russian propaganda. The Post reviewed PropOrNot's findings and our questions about them were answered satisfactorily during the course of multiple interviews."

But that damage-control response was as full of holes as the news story it tried to defend.

For one thing, PropOrNot wasn't just another source for the Post's story. As The New Yorker noted in a devastating article on Dec. 1, the story "prominently cited the PropOrNot research." The Post's account "had the force of revelation, thanks in large part to the apparent scientific authority of PropOrNot's work: the group released a 32-page report detailing its methodology, and named names with its list of 200 suspect news outlets... But a close look at the report showed that it was a mess."

Contrary to the PR message from the Post vice president, PropOrNot did not merely say that the sites on its list had "published or echoed Russian propaganda." Without a word of the slightest doubt or skepticism in the entire story, the Post summarized PropOrNot's characterization of all the websites on its list as falling into two categories: "Some players in this online echo chamber were knowingly part of the propaganda campaign, the researchers concluded, while others were 'useful idiots' -- a term born of the Cold War to describe people or institutions that unknowingly assisted Soviet Union propaganda efforts."

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As The New Yorker pointed out, PropOrNot's criteria for incriminating content were broad enough to include "nearly every news outlet in the world, including the Post itself."

Yet "The List" is not a random list by any means -- it's a targeted mish-mash, naming websites that are not within shouting distance of the U.S. corporate and foreign policy establishment.

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Norman Solomon is the author of "War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death." He is a co-founder of RootsAction.org and the executive director of the Institute for Public Accuracy. This article was first published by (more...)
 

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