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Life Arts    H4'ed 8/4/19

Marianne Williamson: "Dark Psychic Forces" and the Spirit of Capitalism (Sunday Homily)

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Democratic Debate 2019: Williamson discusses Flint and a 'dark, psychic force' Author Marianne Williamson said, .If you think any of this wonkiness is going to deal with this dark psychic force of the collectivized hatred that this president is ...
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Readings for the 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time: ECC 1:2; 2:21-23; PS 90: 3-6; 12-14; 17; COL 3: 1-5; 9-11; MT 5:3; LK 12: 13-21

Marianne Williamson shone brightly again during the first night of the second Democratic debate. This time, with only nine minutes of exposure, she had the whole country talking.

As with her first appearance, her name was the most Google-searched among her nine debate rivals. And afterwards, the Washington Post, for instance, noted her contributions with headlines like "Marianne Williamson Had A Big Night in the Democratic Debate," "Marianne Williamson Made the Most of Her Limited Time . . .," "Marianne Williamson Makes the Case for Reparations in her Breakout Debate Moment," and "I've Worked for Marianne Williamson. She's No Kook."

Additionally, "Democracy Now," the following day gave more time than ever to Marianne's remarks about the Flint water crisis, and about reparations, though, in the process, Intercept columnist, Mehdi Hasan felt compelled to dismiss her (without explanation) as "a little bit kooky, let's be honest."

Meanwhile Cody Fenwick writing for AlterNet favorably included Marianne's comments about reparations among his "Nine Best Moments" of the primary debate. However (significantly for our focus here) his article, "Here Are 9 of the Best Moments and 7 of the Worst from the 2020 Democratic Primary Debate," created a special category for what her campaign considers her most significant remark. Fenwick classified the following as a "Moment that Defied Category." He wrote, "In the course of a rousing speech about the shameful government-triggered water crisis in Flint, Michigan, the author's speech took a bizarre turn: 'If you think any of this wonkiness is going to deal with this dark psychic force of the collectivized hatred that this president is bringing up in this country, then I'm afraid that the Democrats are going to see some very dark days.'" Without further comment, that statement concluded his article.

Thinking it somehow "bizarre," Fenwick was evidently confused by the reference to a "dark psychic force," even though Williamson immediately explained its meaning. She was referring to "the collectivized hatred that this president is bringing up in this country." His confusion resulted, I think, from Williamson's entry into unexplored debate terrain as she attempted to drive the conversation deeper than the cliches and normalized insanity that characterized many of Tuesday's exchanges (like Steve Bullock's disagreement with Elizabeth Warren about first use of nuclear weapons).

What "dark psychic forces" did Williamson have in mind? Judging from her books Healing the Soul of America, and The Politics of Love, they are habits of mind and spirit inculcated by a culture that tolerates, if not celebrates:

  • The collectivized hatred she specifically referenced
  • The mind-set that actually considers first (or any!) use of nuclear weapons as acceptable
  • White supremacy and white nationalism
  • American exceptionalism
  • Imperialism and neocolonialism
  • Child abuse at our borders
  • Regime change wars
  • An all-encompassing gun culture reflected not only in law, but in our films, novels, newspapers, and magazines and especially in military policy

That's just the short list of the dark forces in question. But for Williamson, all of them can be synopsized in the single term "fear." Systemically, they can be summarized in the term "capitalism" and the terror-filled interlocking systems of individualism, competition, and greed that system inspires.

And that brings us to the theme of the liturgy of the word for today's 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time. On my reading, all of them present a light-hearted critique and rejection of the underlying spirit of capitalism. But see if they speak to you in that way. Take a look at them here.

In any case, what follows are my "translations":

ECC 1:2; 2:21-23 (A Book of Hebrew Wisdom)

Accumulating property
And money
Working hard to get it
Worrying about it
Losing sleep over it . . .
Is all foolishness.
And in the end,
You can't take it with you.
How silly to fret
About possessions!

PS 90: 3-6; 12-14; 17

So, soften your heart.
Life is short
It passes
Like the seasons
Like grass.
You might even die
In your sleep tonight.
Instead, enjoy life NOW.
Be happy and kind
And careful
In whatever you do.
That's true prosperity.

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Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Retired in 2014, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 40 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program.Mike blogs (more...)
 

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