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Malcolm X Was Right About America

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Reprinted from Truthdig

From commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Malcolm-x.jpg: Malcolm X
Malcolm X
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NEW YORK--Malcolm X, unlike Martin Luther King Jr., did not believe America had a conscience. For him there was no great tension between the lofty ideals of the nation -- which he said were a sham -- and the failure to deliver justice to blacks. He, perhaps better than King, understood the inner workings of empire. He had no hope that those who managed empire would ever get in touch with their better selves to build a country free of exploitation and injustice. He argued that from the arrival of the first slave ship to the appearance of our vast archipelago of prisons and our squalid, urban internal colonies where the poor are trapped and abused, the American empire was unrelentingly hostile to those Franz Fanon called "the wretched of the earth." This, Malcolm knew, would not change until the empire was destroyed.

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"It is impossible for capitalism to survive, primarily because the system of capitalism needs some blood to suck," Malcolm said. "Capitalism used to be like an eagle, but now it's more like a vulture. It used to be strong enough to go and suck anybody's blood whether they were strong or not. But now it has become more cowardly, like the vulture, and it can only suck the blood of the helpless. As the nations of the world free themselves, then capitalism has less victims, less to suck, and it becomes weaker and weaker. It's only a matter of time in my opinion before it will collapse completely."

King was able to achieve a legal victory through the civil rights movement, portrayed in the new film "Selma." But he failed to bring about economic justice and thwart the rapacious appetite of the war machine that he was acutely aware was responsible for empire's abuse of the oppressed at home and abroad. And 50 years after Malcolm X was assassinated in the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem by hit men from the Nation of Islam, it is clear that he, not King, was right. We are the nation Malcolm knew us to be. Human beings can be redeemed. Empires cannot. Our refusal to face the truth about empire, our refusal to defy the multitudinous crimes and atrocities of empire, has brought about the nightmare Malcolm predicted. And as the Digital Age and our post-literate society implant a terrifying historical amnesia, these crimes are erased as swiftly as they are committed.

"Sometimes, I have dared to dream ... that one day, history may even say that my voice -- which disturbed the white man's smugness, and his arrogance, and his complacency -- that my voice helped to save America from a grave, possibly even fatal catastrophe," Malcolm wrote.

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The integration of elites of color, including Barack Obama, into the upper echelons of institutional and political structures has done nothing to blunt the predatory nature of empire. Identity and gender politics -- we are about to be sold a woman president in the form of Hillary Clinton -- have fostered, as Malcolm understood, fraud and theft by Wall Street, the evisceration of our civil liberties, the misery of an underclass in which half of all public school children live in poverty, the expansion of our imperial wars and the deep and perhaps fatal exploitation of the ecosystem.

And until we heed Malcolm X, until we grapple with the truth about the self-destruction that lies at the heart of empire, the victims, at home and abroad, will mount. Malcolm, like James Baldwin, understood that only by facing the truth about who we are as members of an imperial power can people of color, along with whites, be liberated. This truth is bitter and painful. It requires an acknowledgment of our capacity for evil, injustice and exploitation, and it demands repentance. But we cling like giddy children to the lies we tell ourselves about ourselves. We refuse to grow up. And because of these lies, perpetrated across the cultural and political spectrum, liberation has not taken place. Empire devours us all.

"We're anti-evil, anti-oppression, anti-lynching," Malcolm said. "You can't be anti- those things unless you're also anti- the oppressor and the lyncher. You can't be anti-slavery and pro-slavemaster; you can't be anti-crime and pro-criminal. In fact, Mr. Muhammad teaches that if the present generation of whites would study their own race in the light of true history, they would be anti-white themselves."

Malcolm once said that, had he been a middle-class black who was encouraged to go to law school, rather than a poor child in a detention home who dropped out of school at 15, "I would today probably be among some city's professional black bourgeoisie, sipping cocktails and palming myself off as a community spokesman for and leader of the suffering black masses, while my primary concern would be to grab a few more crumbs from the groaning board of the two-faced whites with whom they're begging to 'integrate.' "

Malcolm's family, struggling and poor, was callously ripped apart by state agencies in a pattern that remains unchanged. The courts, substandard schooling, roach-filled apartments, fear, humiliation, despair, poverty, greedy bankers, abusive employers, police, jails and probation officers did their work then as they do it now. Malcolm saw racial integration as a politically sterile game, one played by a black middle class anxious to sell its soul as an enabler of empire and capitalism. "The man who tosses worms in the river," Malcolm said, "isn't necessarily a friend of the fish. All the fish who take him for a friend, who think the worm's got no hook on it, usually end up in the frying pan." He related to the apocalyptic battles in the Book of Revelation where the persecuted rise up in revolt against the wicked.

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"Martin [Luther King Jr.] doesn't have the revolutionary fire that Malcolm had until the very end of his life," Cornel West says in his book with Christa Buschendorf, "Black Prophetic Fire." "And by revolutionary fire I mean understanding the system under which we live, the capitalist system, the imperial tentacles, the American empire, the disregard for life, the willingness to violate law, be it international law or domestic law. Malcolm understood that from very early on, and it hit Martin so hard that he does become a revolutionary in his own moral way later in his short life, whereas Malcolm had the revolutionary fire so early in his life."

There are three great books on Malcolm X: "The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley," "The Death and Life of Malcolm X" by Peter Goldman and "Martin & Malcolm & America: A Dream or a Nightmare" by James H. Cone.

On Friday I met Goldman -- who as a reporter for a St. Louis newspaper and later for Newsweek knew and covered Malcolm -- in a New York City cafe. Goldman was part of a tiny circle of white reporters Malcolm respected, including Charles Silberman of Fortune and M.S. "Mike" Handler of The New York Times, who Malcolm once said had "none of the usual prejudices or sentimentalities about black people."

Goldman and his wife, Helen Dudar, who also was a reporter, first met Malcolm in 1962 at the Shabazz Frosti Kreem, a Black Muslim luncheonette in St. Louis' north-side ghetto. At that meeting Malcolm poured some cream into his coffee. "Coffee is the only thing I liked integrated," he commented. He went on: "The average Negro doesn't even let another Negro know what he thinks, he's so mistrusting. He's an acrobat. He had to be to survive in this civilization. But by me being a Muslim, I'm black first -- my sympathies are black, my allegiance is black, my whole objectives are black. By me being a Muslim, I'm not interested in being American, because America has never been interested in me."

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Chris Hedges spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He has reported from more than 50 countries and has worked for The Christian Science Monitor, National Public Radio, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Times, for which he was a foreign correspondent for 15 years.

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