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Life Arts    H1'ed 6/21/20

Jeremiads for America: Six Unspeakable Propositions (& One Glimmer of Hope)

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Readings for 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time: JEREMIAH 20: 10-13; PSALM 69:8-17, 33-35; ROMANS 5: 12-15; MATTHEW 10: 26-33

Today's readings can be seen as centralizing the term "jeremiad." In that light, and despite its usually dismissive connotations, I hope you'll consider what I'm about to say as belonging to that prophetic category. I make it my own in a spirit of desperation generated by the trouble we all observe in our streets these days following the murder of George Floyd. What follows is entirely consistent with a liberation theology perspective -- the most important theological development in the last 1500 years.

Jeremiads

According to online dictionaries, "jeremiad" refers to a sermon or another work that accounts for the misfortunes of an era as a just penalty for great social and moral evils but holds out hope for changes that will bring a happier future.

The word derives from the name of the biblical prophet, Jeremiah whose words set the tone for today's liturgy of the word. Taken together, the day's readings might be considered commentary on his opening denunciation of his own country, Judah.

By way of context, you should know that Jeremiah did his work during the Babylonian Exile (roughly, 597 - 538 BCE), when his country's elite had been abducted to what is modern day Iraq. Jeremiah attributed that defining tragedy to the infidelity of Judah's leadership to their covenant with their God. Above all, it mandated care for the nation's poor, its widows, and orphans.

Instead, its kings and upper classes were busy lining their own pockets while neglecting the very ones their religious traditions identified as God's favorites. For Jeremiah, that neglect represented a rejection of God's very self. It accordingly merited a half century of exile from the Holy Land and God's special presence there.

With all of that in mind, please read today's biblical selections. To repeat, they will lay the groundwork for my contemporary jeremiads that might be addressed to the United States. What follows are my "translations" of the readings. You can review them for yourself here to see if I got them right.

Today's Readings

JEREMIAH 20: 10-13: I am surrounded by state terrorists. They monitor my slightest missteps using a sophisticated surveillance apparatus and sting operations that seek revenge for my damning accusations. But I remain undeterred. My rich persecutors are the ones who will end up confused and shamed. YHWH, the champion of the poor, will see to that.

PSALMS 69: 8-17, 33-35: In fact, nothing can stop any genuine prophet from siding with the poor: not public shame, not family ostracization, not insults or curses. Bolstered by divine kindness, mercy and love, all prophets speak words of comfort to the impoverished and imprisoned. In this, God's spokespersons are one with the Source of Life itself that fills the seas and skies and the very hearts of humanity.

ROMANS 5: 12-15: The prophet, Paul of Tarsus, was no different from Jeremiah. Shockingly, he identified Law itself as the source of the world's evil - an evil tool of the rich and powerful to control God's favorites (the poor and despised) with feelings of guilt and shame. For Paul, Jesus the Christ - the greatest of the anarchistic prophets -- rendered all such law obsolete.

MATTHEW 10: 26-33: In that spirit, Jesus advised absolute refusal to accept the regulations, cover-ups and "state secrets" of the rich and powerful. Their every utterance should be disclosed for the lie it is. Speak truth then, Jesus said, even in the face of death threats. It is far better to lose your life rather than surrender to lies of Rulers from Hell. Follow the example of prophets who though typically assassinated, preserved their integrity by telling the truth of a loving God committed to the poor and oppressed.

Jeremiads for America

So, in the spirit of those words from Jeremiah, Paul and Jesus the Christ, let's review some of the most profound reasons for the police riots in our streets. I feel confident our three prophets would say that taken together, the following half-dozen propositions describe elements that have shaped our national reality of damning racism and police state violence. Our readings direct us to face up to these defining truths and take our lead from those vilified by mainstream culture - our nation's indigenous, descendants of slaves, and the Latinx community.

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Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Retired in 2014, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 40 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program. His latest book is (more...)
 

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