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OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 6/28/21

Indian farmers march to Delhi to mark 7 months of protest against farm laws

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Message Abdus-Sattar Ghazali
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Farmers protesting against the Centre's three new agriculture laws marked seven months of their agitation at Delhi's borders on Saturday June 26, reported The Indian Express. The protestors have decided to march towards the national Capital from their respective locations.

The Samyukt Kisan Morcha appealed to protesting farmers across all states to submit memorandums, addressed to President Ram Nath Kovind, to governors. The protest has been named "Kheti Bachao, Loktantra Bachao Diwas [save agriculture, save democracy day]".

"In the last seven months, farmer unions of India, led by Samyukt Kisan Morcha, organised one of the world's largest and longest continuous protests," said Darshan Pal of the Bharatiya Kisan Union. "Thousands have joined in from different parts of the country. We plan to intensify our stir as well."

Thousands of farmers have camped outside Delhi since November, demanding that the central government repeal the three laws that open up the country's agriculture markets to private companies. The farmers have hunkered down with supplies that they say will last them for months, and have resolved to not leave until their demands are met.

According to F. William Engdahl, Research Associate of the Centre for Research on Globalization, the Modi reforms were motivated by a well-organized effort of the World Economic Forum (WEF) and its New Vision for Agriculture, part of Klaus Schwab's Great Reset, the corporate side of the UN Agenda 2030.

In September, 2020 in a rushed Parliamentary voice vote, rather than a duly-registered formal vote, and reportedly with no prior consultation with Indian farmer unions or organizations, the government of Prime Minister Narenda Modi passed three new laws radically deregulating India's agriculture. That has sparked months of national farmer protest and nationwide strikes. The protests which are spreading across all India, demands repeal of the three laws.

In effect the laws end restrictions on large corporations' buying land and stockpiling commodities to control farmer prices. They also allow large multinational businesses to bypass local or regional state markets where farmers' produce is normally sold at guaranteed prices, and allows business to strike direct deals with farmers. This all will result in the ruin of an estimated tens millions of marginal or smallholder farmers and small middlemen in India's fragile food chain, Engdahl said adding:

"The new Modi laws are measures the IMF and World Bank have been demanding since the early 1990s to bring Indian agriculture and farming into the corporate agribusiness model pioneered in the USA by the Rockefeller Foundation decades ago. Until now no Indian government has been willing to attack the farmers, the country's largest population group, many of whom are on tiny plots or bare subsistence.

"Modi's argument is that by changing the present system, Indian farmers could "double" income by 2022, an unproven, dubious claim. It allows corporations to buy farm land for the first time nationally so large companies, food processing firms, and exporters can invest in the farm sector. Against them a small farmer has no chance. Who's behind the radical push? Here we find the WEF and the Gates Foundation's radical globalized agriculture agenda."

The laws are a direct result of several years' effort of the World Economic Forum and its New Vision for Agriculture (NVA) initiative. For more than 12 years the WEF and its NVA has pushed a corporate model in Africa, Latin America and Asia. The "big target" has been India, where resistance to corporate takeover of agriculture has been fierce ever since the failed 1960's Green Revolution of the Rockefeller Foundation. For the WEF Great Reset, better known as the UN Agenda 2030 for "sustainable agriculture," India's traditional farm and food system must be broken. Its smallholder family farmers must be forced to sell to large agribusiness conglomerates and regional or state-level protections for those farmers eliminated. It will be "sustainable," not for the small farmers, but rather the giant agribusiness groups, Engdahl concluded.

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Author and journalist. Author of Islamic Pakistan: Illusions & Reality; Islam in the Post-Cold War Era; Islam & Modernism; Islam & Muslims in the Post-9/11 America. Currently working as free lance journalist. Executive Editor of American (more...)
 
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