Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 6 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Exclusive to OpEdNews:
OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 3/22/17

Gorsuch's Gory Expansion of Corporate Personhood

By       (Page 1 of 5 pages)     (# of views)   2 comments
Author 37121
Follow Me on Twitter     Message Greg Coleridge
Become a Fan
  (7 fans)


(Image by Occupy Venice Beach Rolling Rebellion)   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch didn't invent "corporate personhood," the shorthand term used to describe the ludicrous decisions by U.S. Supreme Courts to sanctify corporate entities with inalienable constitutional rights intended exclusively for human beings.

- Advertisement -

As a federal judge, however, Gorsuch contributed to its expansion by applying it in creatively delusional ways in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby1. That 2014 case established that a "closely held"2 for-profit corporation, apart from the human beings connected to it, possesses religious rights.

Corporations were originally subordinate to We the People

- Advertisement -

Supreme Court Justices began more than a century ago twisting existing constitutional doctrines into a pretzel to justify with straight faces that, indeed, legal documents issued by the federal and individual state governments possessed constitutional rights.

As followers of the Program on Corporations, Law & Democracy (POCLAD) are well aware, corporate entities were not intended originally at the nation's founding to possess inalienable constitutional rights. They were granted charters, or licenses, one at a time by We the People via legislatures that precisely defined their actions. These included, among many others, limited charter durations and purposes, limits on the amount of land ownership, and stipulations of who could be corporate directors

Corporate charters were deemed to be democratic tools wielded to ensure public authority and control over subordinate corporate creations by the public. The corporate charter conferred "privileges," not "rights." Corporations were designed to be publicly accountable. If a corporation violated the democratically determined terms of its charter, state legislators or courts often revoked its charter with its assets distributed to those negatively impacted.

- Advertisement -

In a 1900 ruling to revoke the charter of a dairy corporation, the Ohio Supreme Court stated:

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 2   Well Said 1   Valuable 1  
Rate It | View Ratings

Greg Coleridge Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Greg Coleridge is Outreach Director of Move to Amend. He previously worked for more than three decades with the American Friends Service Committee in Ohio where he educated, advocated and organized on a range of justice, peace, environmental (more...)
 

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

127 Reasons Why Reversing Citizens United is NOT Enough

The country is broken because the system is fixed

The Pushback Against Ending Corporate Rule

How Can Obama Invest in the Economy, Create Jobs, and Not Raise the Debt? Use Government Issued Debt Free Money

Fracking Democracy

"One Nation" March Organizers Should Remember Coxey's Army