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OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 7/4/20

Good news from back page to front

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The Yankees resume .spring. training in The Bronx.
The Yankees resume .spring. training in The Bronx.
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By Bob Gaydos

The boys of summer are going to finally start playing baseball ... in July. Better late than never. Basketball and hockey players will be busy, too. For them, it's unfinished business.

This falls in the category of good news, for the players and fans, not to mention team owners and all the ancillary employees. Sports may be considered a diversion by some, a trifle to others. But to millions, sports are a welcome, even healthful, escape. As citizens of an agitated world, we can all use something to, if only temporarily, take our minds off, you know, things. Something to at least start the day without anxiety and angst.

I began following the late Earl Warren's formula for starting the day in my late teens: Begin reading in the back of the paper with the sports pages. Warren said: "I always turn to the sports pages first, which records people's accomplishments. The front page has nothing but man's failures."

For me, it was the New York Daily News. Look at the other stuff later; it'll still be there. I figured if it was good enough for a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, it was good enough me. Who won? Who pitched? How many, how fast, how about that?

Later, when I was a sports editor for a couple of years, I tried to make my pages entertaining enough for other followers of Warren's philosophy. Here's your morning jolt, sports fans! I don't know if I succeeded, but it was certainly fun for me.

So when they stopped sports along with everything else four months ago, it was bad news. There was nowhere to go for diversion. Netflix has served a purpose, but it's tough to start the real day with fantasy heroes. Who hit the buzzer beater? Did the Knicks actually win? Who's playing shortstop for the Yankees this year?

I know it won't be the same for a while. Maybe ever. So it'll be different. But it's likely that there will be pro sports later this month and, more likely, pro football in the fall. Go Giants! That's good news.

If you're wondering why I'm focusing on good news here, it's because of a comment Emma Gonzalez-Laders, a faithful reader, made on my most recent column: "You're not normally the bringer of good news. I like this twist."

The "twist" she was referring to was taking a week's worth of events that didn't go the way Donald Trump would have liked Supreme Court rulings, botched firings, campaign rallies in empty stadiums, stuff like that and reporting it as good news. It's what one has had to do to find "good news" in an age of all-Trump, all-chaos, all the time. It can get exhausting.

But, nothing is forever. Witness the results of a recent poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The poll, taken shortly after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, reported that about half of American adults believe police violence against the public is a "very" or "extremely" serious problem. Last September, that same poll showed only about one-third of American adults felt that way.

That is a significant change in a short period of time on a controversial social issue. The poll also revealed that 61 percent of Americans say police in most communities are more likely to use deadly force against a black person than a white person. That compares with 49 percent in 2015. And only about a third of Americans say the race of a person does not make a difference in the police use of deadly force. In 2015, half of Americans felt that way. Significantly, 65 percent said that police officers who cause injury or death in the course of their job are treated too leniently by the justice system, a 24-point increase over 2015.

The poll results, along with the nationwide demonstrations protesting the way police took Floyd into custody an officer knelt on his neck for eight minutes while three officers stood by and watched suggest that Americans are finally ready to rethink the role of police in their communities. Indeed, there has been a flurry of legislative action at city, state and federal levels to redefine the police mission, reduce police budgets, rethink training and recruiting, strip forces of military hardware, even eliminate police forces since Floyd's much-viewed death.

The fact that Floyd's death was recorded and played millions of times on social media and that, subsequently, other examples of police violence against peaceful protesters were similarly recorded and played on social media for the world to see certainly had to play a role in this dramatic sea change in public opinion, as compared to the slow change in societal attitudes on other issues such as same sex marriage. It was finally hard to deny what people were seeing with their own eyes, over and over again.

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Bob Gaydos is a veteran of 40-plus years in daily newspapers. He began as police reporter with The (Binghamton, N.Y.) Sun-Bulletin, eventually covering government and politics as well as serving as city editor, features editor, sports editor and (more...)
 

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