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OpEdNews Op Eds    H1'ed 6/5/19

Forgiving Debt to Invest in Environmental Healing

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Fir seedling, in author's hand [photo by author]
Fir seedling, in author's hand [photo by author]
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"I want you to act as if the house is on fire. Because it is." Greta Thunberg

The US economy is awash in debt.

  • As of the fourth quarter of 2018, household debt in the US totaled $13.54 trillion. The largest portion of this is mortgage debt, which totalled $9.12 trillion. [source]
  • As of March 2019, total credit card debt is $1.057 trillion, which is an average of $8,286 per household. The average debt per card-holding adult is $5,839. Much of it is incurred to pay healthcare costs. [source]
  • As of February 2019, student loan debt is $1.56 trillion. This is held by 44.7 million people, with an average debt of $29,800 and average monthly payment of $393. $101 billion of it is in default. [source]
  • In the first quarter of 2019, auto loans totaled $1.28 trillion. About 6.5% of these loans were 90 days or more delinquent in February of this year. That's around 7 million people. [source]

This explosion in personal debt is not normal or healthy and is hobbling an increasing number of people. A state of de facto peonage is emerging. The levels of inequality in the US today are literally medieval (though peasants had it better when it came to days off: "Altogether there were about 80 days of complete rest with over 70 partial holidays, that is, about three months of rest spread over the year" [source]).

More and more people are struggling financially. According to National Payroll Week's 2018 "Getting Paid in America" survey, 38% of respondents would find it "very difficult" to "meet [their] current financial obligations if [their] next paycheck were delayed for a week" and 31% would find it "somewhat difficult." Those who answered "not very" or "not at all" difficult totaled 28 1/2% together. If this situation is not yet "dire," it sure is headed in that direction.

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When securing necessities becomes so arduous, then stress, anger and depression result, and from these, conflict, violence and self-harm.

Just at a time when we need to come together and work collectively for change, more and more of us are distracted by mere survival and, failing at even that, are sliding into addiction, disease and dysfunction. At some point, society reaches a breaking point, and under such circumstances is unlikely to instantly evolve into, say, an enlightened socialist utopia. Not without first passing through a brutal period of ramped-up state authoritarianism, anyway, and I, for one, ain't gonna wish for that.

The pressure needs to be released. Space must be made for something new. One thing we have to do is to forgive all the debts.

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This is where skeptics will want to steer the subject into the supposed impossibility of such a thing. They will sound very sensible, peppering their arguments with appeals to "fairness" or "pragmatism." Don't listen. What they're really saying is that in the choice between survival and extinction, survival is not feasible. This is not "realistic;" it is deeply cynical, as well as self-hating. That's not where we want to live.

In the ancient world (pre-Roman), "jubilees" were regularly declared, when personal/household debt was forgiven. However, this was easier to do then since the main creditor in a society was a king. The rise of financial institutions eventually usurped the royal role and that's the trap we're in now. (For those interested in an in-depth discussion of historic jubilees, and alternatives that could be implemented contemporaneously, see "Could/Should Jubilee Debt Cancellations be Reintroduced Today?" by economists Michael Hudson and Charles Goodhart.)

Rather than getting hung up on the how, we can assume that where there's a will there's a way, and move on to what would need to happen next (which will include demonetizing all necessities so that no one will be distracted from participating).

"The one word you never hear during all these discussions on climate change is: Sacrifice." Forrest Palmer

Debt forgiveness cannot be about simply relieving us of financial concerns and leaving our lifestyles otherwise intact. This isn't about trading useless toil for pointless leisure, or even for "innovation." With the dismissal of debt must also come the end of business-as-usual, which is to say, of ecocide.

Let me stress this point: We need debt forgiveness so that we can pay off who we really owe: Mother Nature.

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This thought occurred to me recently on a farm job. The owner cut down some trees to expand greenhouse space, including two big oaks that turned out to be old growth upon inspection of the rings on the stumps. Later, while weeding beds for this year's crops, I potted up many of the Oak and Fir seedlings that I found. I considered that the owner had put himself in debt to the land by taking out full-grown trees, and that tending new ones was therefore an absolutely essential task. He saw my collection of babies one day but had no comment when I said (very politely and non-judgmentally) they were toward the trees that had been taken out. I doubt there's much of a chance he will pursue the project after I am gone, but I felt compelled to do it anyway. Just putting such things out there has a real, if small or subtle effect on the universe (as would his dismissal of the debt, if that is his choice).

Oak seedling, with stump of old growth oak [photo by author]
Oak seedling, with stump of old growth oak [photo by author]
(Image by Kollibri terre Sonnenblume)
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Just as this one person has been cutting down trees and not replacing them, so has our society been transforming half of the planet into "resources" that we pillage without replenishing, and then treating the other half as a dumping ground for the toxic pollution that results.

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Kollibri terre Sonnenblume is a writer, photographer, tree hugger, animal lover, and dissident. Kollibri's work can be found at http://www.macskamoksha.com."



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