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Der Fuhrer Furor: I Buried Pall

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Der Fuhrer Furor: I Buried Pall

by John Kendall Hawkins

Well, they're at it again.

Blaming Russkies for our own problems. It shows the extent to which we have kompromat-ized our own exceptionalism. We don't make and fix democracies anymore, anywhere, not even at home. America's Republican Democracy is a Classic Coke that won't be coming back -- no matter how much we protest and sing mountainside Teach the World to Sing. Like Leonard Cohen sings in "The Future," It's over, it ain't going / any further. (Evolution, he means.) The more the MSM pisses down golden showers onto the bed that the long-departed (good riddance!) ex-president Donald Trump slept in at the White House, the more readers realize that we are the kompromat we've been waiting for. Our own doozy dossiers.

Luke Harding's article in the Guardian last week regarding secret, newly discovered troves of dirt on DJ was too embarrassing to call journalism. As some pundits and punsters have pointed out already, we don't need any more snaky insinuations from highly placed anonymous sources -- about anything. But Harding's "Kremlin papers appear to show Putin's plot to put Trump in White House" was just f*cking nonsense. The reader is told that Putin himself authorized the emplacement of the "mentally unstable" DJ into the White House in order to stir up "social turmoil" in America. We don't get a firsthand .pdf peak at the doco, we just get an "assessment" that it, if it exists, came from the Kremlin, and, no doubt, was an assessment from someone with the integrity of serial-liar John Brennan, who not only invites truths for sleep-overs at his abbatoir, but keeps body parts in the freezer.

Luke Harding's the "reporter" who gave us the 2018 wicked leaks about dodgy doings in the Ecuadorian embassy between Julian Assange and Paul Manafort that never developed into reality. A building surrounded by police and media 24 hours per day outside, and, we later discovered, totally filled with surveillance apparatuses inside, could not discover one photo of Manafort with Assange (or, preferably, Pam Anderson), and no snippets of shared sound ever emerged. If you can't get such snaps and snippets of Murdoch-driven conversation in England (remember the News of the World-gate scandal?), you can't get it anywhere. I'm told that only the Chinese people are more surveilled than the UK. F*ck it.

Maybe someone should look into whether Luke Harding has ties to Christopher Steele. The two could give up information processing and do a goofy magic ventriloquism show for kids together, alternating laps and lips between sets.

But the real moonboggler and hostage taker of the reader's attention is encased in Lloyd Green's Guardian review, "Donald Trump as wannabe Fuhrer -- in another riveting read." The book in question is I Alone Can Fix It by Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker, two reporters for the Washington Post ("Democracy Dies In Darkness Daily"), who are, here, following up on the NYT bestseller about Trump's first three years in office -- A Very Stable Genius. Thanks to the Russkies, Genius argued. It came out in late January 2020, you know, when Trump was being pointlessly impeached, Covid-19 was on a first-class flight to America, and everyone anticipated the relief value of the Super Bowl so much (catharsis after the pointless Senate vote) that there was serious talk of making the Monday After the bowl a national holiday. Look at us now, all scraggly and blue.

Genius was a bestseller, Lloyd Green loved it, but some critics questioned the need to keep beating and beating and beating that dead horse (such a scene, let's recall, broke Nietzsche's heart in twain and drove him quite mad), which ranked high for prurience, knowing irony and schadenfreude, but low for new insights, or even verifiable facts. The Russkies didn't hack the DNC in 2016 for emails, as claimed. The Steele Dossier was solidly debunked -- by the US government itself. And Hillary won (but for the disgrace of the godawful electoral college silliness, fully gameable by secretaries of state). But I Alone Can Fix It is idiocy.

Green calls it sumptuous or something like that, a veritable feast or smorgasbord of the trite and trivial and old. Its main concern is Trump's last year in office culminating in the so-called insurrection of January 6, 2021, the day that the electoral college votes from all 50 states were being certified by the House. Since it was known that the head of the Proud Boys was an FBI informant and that QAnon was made up of yodel-yokels with heads filled with Billy Idol rebel yells, and, by another count, a goodly number of failed stand-up comedians. I mean, check out the photo below, and ask yourself if this is the leader of the much-needed Insurrection you've been waiting for to save our planet and democracy, or a clear indication that we have reached End Times? And, also, is that cop keeping them out or showing them the way to Nancy's podium?

QAnon Shaman asegura que Trump lo .prepar. a e'l y a quienes irrumpieron en el Capitolio.....Watkins busc el perdn de Trump para su cliente mientras an ocupaba la Casa Blanca, pero no tuvo e'xito en sus esfuerzos.
QAnon Shaman asegura que Trump lo .prepar. a e'l y a quienes irrumpieron en el Capitolio.....Watkins busc el perdn de Trump para su cliente mientras an ocupaba la Casa Blanca, pero no tuvo e'xito en sus esfuerzos.
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In I Alone Can Fix It, Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker want to make the case that Trump intended to execute a coup d'etat along the lines of the Nazi rise to power beginning with the Reichstag fire of 1933. As many readers will recall, when Hitler got all discombobulated and meinkampf hissy, after his precious art career was sabotaged by die Juden, of course, he castrated his paintbrush and pasted it under his nose to give us that look that few have cared to emulate, except for that winklesome tart Charlie Chaplin. To prop up this silly, putzy notion of a Tr(i)ump(h)ian putsch, the authors wheel in General Mark Milley, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, to discuss DJ's Der Wille Zur Macht, und sein Triumph of the Will, and to compare the January 6 march on das Capitol to the Nuremberg rallies.

Milley is quoted as an authority figure throughout the review. He avers, "This is a Reichstag moment," und es ist "The gospel of the Fuhrer," und, "brownshirts" uber alles. And that's basically it for Milley's take. Hardly enough to support the furious headline. The dynamic duo from WaPo then seamlessly slip in another unnamed "senior official" who refers to Trump as "a guy who takes fuel, throws it on the fire, and makes you scared shitless," then says, "'I will protect you.'" This is an old CIA strategy known as Be the Chaos. Be the Solution™ (i.e., bomb them into prehistory, then bring in Halliburton with a pocket Marshall plan to civilize the heathens who 'hate us for who we are' -- with TVs and stuff).

Well, you have to consider the source of primary opiners in a piece. Is Milley a nut job or legit? On the surface, where most of us skate blithely along like it was the Rockefeller Center ice rink at Christmas (all la di-dah, as Annie Hall would say, until Marshall McLuhan would come along to punch her in the face to wake her up to The Struggle of Mankind), Milley's alright. He's military, but he's alright. I did my due dil and checked out his wikipedia page and discovered that he went to precious Belmont high school and has degrees from Princeton and Columbia. Belmont -- I'm thinking. I was a forward on the hoop squad at Groton around that time, more aggressive than I am today, and, for all I know, I may have gone paint on the silly billy Milley, put the rock down in his face, leading to his later thesis, "A Critical Analysis of Revolutionary Guerrilla Organization in Theory and Practice." Yeah, that's right, mofo.

Where it gets interesting with Milley, the ROTC and airborne guy, is his steady rise to power -- infantry, special forces, then, one day, general, and then Trump picked him to be chairman of the JCoS over the recommendations of Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, and then-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joseph Dunford, who favored Air Force Chief of Staff General David L. Goldfein for the appointment. But Milley was alright. He favored a modernized Army, with a bottom-up approach, where younger soldiers with fresher ideas could be influential in how, say, the Army dealt with Climate Change (this is considered below). But though he was fingered by the MSM as one of the adults in the room, Milley did participate in two military operations, one of which was probably illegal, making him, frankly, a criminal. According to Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist James Risen of The Intercept, "Donald Trump Murdered Qassim Suleimani." Milley was in charge of the operation. You do the math.

But maybe more troubling is Milley's apparent and not fully explained participation with Trump in the Washington, DC, face-down of largely black protesters against the murder of George Floyd. He was with Trump when the tear gas was deployed against the protesters and he was later criticized -- by other generals, and even by the MSM -- for being there with Trump, and for later refusing to testify before Congress about the military's role in the protest. So, Der Fuhrer Furor would need to be evaluated by readers for this reason alone. And in the book, the authors don't spend much time or depth pursuing the Nazi angle; the off-the-cuff remarks reported in the Green review are cherry-picked out of a wider context.

Jeesh. You'd think DJ was still in office with the fuss the MSM has displayed. Surely, the focus on Trump is an attempt by the MSM to leverage the hostility and aggression Trump and his act-alikes (and wanna bees) have engendered on January 6, and more recently with the maudlin attempts to fix future electoral processes in multiple states, for the sole purpose of pushing an agenda that will result in Congress passing more domestic national-security legislation.

The MSM focus on Trump's inane claims to voter fraud also helps mask the fact that it was probably the mail-in vote, as a response to the pandemic, that prevented the moron from winning again. The extra scrutiny that came with those votes this time prevented Trump from obtaining the deciding votes he needed by a simple telephone call, as had been the standard practice in previous elections (see Palast). Remember, reader, he almost won anyway: several states were so close that they required re-counts. Thank you, Covid, but now expect a return to normal corruption. Not Voter Fraud, but disenfranchisement, because we just don't care to fix it, or own up to it.

The notion that Trump could be compared to someone as evil as Hitler, who had architecture designed for him, enjoyed epic Wagnerian music, Norse mythology, propagandistic oratory, and brownshirts, is bizarre, and makes one wonder if mainstream Americans can hold on to any aspect of history or reality for very long before turning it into a Marvel comic book full of jaded, anachronistic heroes who fight -- what? Emptiness? Brownshirts, you say? QAnon and the Proud Boys are more like brown noses. They'd probably arf, if Trump rang the Pavlovian bell. Sometimes you gotta just let sleeping dogmas lie. When they're not barking up a tree, they're peeing up a tree.

In the most recent issue of Harper's, a serendipitous piece on Hannah Arendt's influence on critics of Trump during his White House years, "Men in Dark Times" by Rebecca Panovka, completely and justifiably debunks comparisons we're hearing these days of Trump's Hitler-like rise. Panovka sums up the craze succinctly:

According to Arendt, Hitler felt compelled to play along with his predictions, following conspiracies to their inevitable conclusions, often against reason and even self-interest; he was not content to lie without reorganizing the actual world accordingly... To accuse Trump of anything so sophisticated is to misread his lies altogether.

Just so true. To me, Trump is our American Yeltsin, so boffo that Fellini could've worked with it. For the MSM to spend any time on this nonsense means they're still squeezing his bitter lemons for the ka-ching value it still has. Ads. William Hurt with the onion in Broadcast News comes to mind.

I Buried Pall: What the Press Should Be Reporting About Milley

Okay, so we've seen that Gen. Milley went to the best schools and may be a "murderer," and, for all his bluster about reichstags and brownshirts, was last seen beside Trump (holding an upside-down Bible) when teargas was fired into a crowd of George Floyd protesters. But there's more. If Milley was going to be brought into the Morning Joe "conversation," then a grand opportunity was missed to grill him on far more consequential information of public interest: The terrifying conclusions and revelations of the 2019 War College Report (WCR) on the Implications of Climate Change for the U.S. Army that Milley commissioned. Probably the MSM was thrown off by the title that seems to limit the discussion of climate change to the Army, or else it's too busy working the two-minute hate on Trump to care.

But the report is actually a couched study that explicitly maintains that what happens to the Army, in the 50-year period interrogated, is a microcosm of the national and global scene. Like a 2018 civilian study recently released, "Climate Scientists to World: We Have Only 20 Years Before There's No Turning Back," the military's data and reasoning is more disheartening -- and more recent. Both reports indicate a very limited timeframe for 'mitigating' our environmental circumstances -- each posits 20 years as a red line rubicon of no-return kaputsky.

What makes the WCR more depressing is that it posits the assumption that the highly regimented organization that is the Army, where there is a hierarchical command structure in place, is the best bet for implementing the required mitigating steps to offset and respond to Climate Change. The report starts out as a welcome adult-in-the-room approach, beginning with a knocking back of denial:

The analysis assumes, based on the preponderance of evidence available, that significant changes in climate have already occurred, likely to worsen in the years ahead. The study did not look to ascribe causation to climate change (man-made or natural), as causation is distinct from effects and not pertinent to the approximately 50-year horizon considered for the study. The study does, however, assume that human behavior can mitigate both the size and consequences of negative impacts that result from climate change.

Sounds almost like a plan. Certainly, a helpful attitude is on display in eschewing political blame for practical steps with which to respond.

But the Milley-driven report makes clear throughout that a significant barrier to the much-required dynamic energy required by the dire circumstances is the failure of the military hierarchy to listen to its young professional soldiers for solutions. The report:

The youth of the military is a powerful potential source of cultural change. If the younger population as a whole is more environmentally conscious in the United States, it stands to reason that the younger members of the military will be as well. However, the military as a highly hierarchical organization is resistant to the adoption of innovative input from lower ranking and younger individuals.

Typical of the report, it attempts to parallel the hindrances of the military with those of the civilians. Old wood is blocking new ideas in Congress, too. The youngsters, who are inheriting a broken world, are being suppressed by farting fatcats who want to continue making bundles of cash at a time when such acquisition almost doesn't even matter any more. But the report's prognosis for change along hierarchical lines is poor.

The report is, of course, focussed on how climate change will affect the defenders of our nation-state, so necessarily the report's authors keep an eye on military infrastructure, and the moves required to anticipate significant catastrophic changes in the near future. But there is symbiotic activity between civilians and the military that bears further study. The report is deeply concerned that 'civilian' infrastructure, especially electric grids, will become subject to attacks that could not only ruin the economy but cripple the military, or, at best, require the military to be side-tracked by domestic-unrest management.

The report is not inspiring, but what makes it scary, and where it begins to lose its sobriety, is when it discusses the Arctic region and its thawing. The report does a good job describing the rising sea levels and dangers to freshwater by the new intrusion of salt, and paints an especially grim picture of sea level Bangladesh, but then we get a transition sentence: "These Arctic changes present both challenges and opportunities." Uh-hunh.

Suddenly, we're needing to shore up the Army to fight turf wars in the icy climes of the Arctic because "...according to a 2008 U.S. Geological survey, the Arctic likely holds approximately one quarter of the world's undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves." So, back to the race for oil. And fighting Russkies, who already have a foothold there. The report continues,

Whether due to increased commercial shipping traffic or expanded opportunities for hydrocarbon extraction, increased economic activity will drive a requirement for increased military expenditures specific to that region. In short, competition will increase.

Recalls the lyrics from early Dylan's "I Shall Be Free No. 10": Well, I don't know, but I've been told / The streets in heaven are lined with gold / I ask you how things could get much worse/ If the Russians happen to get up there first / Wowee! pretty scary!

We should be building arks and buying up cave property in Cappadocia, but, no, we still need oil. All the other priorities in the report are skewed toward crazy, too. So, if it's a parallel to civilian doings, we'll soon have a Gulp War on our hands.

But the worst is saved for last. The Appendix to the report is nothing less than astonishing in its revelations. First, in 2017 the Pentagon finally comes clean and admits that maybe there's some truth after all to UFOs (now to be referred to as UAPs). And now, here, in this 2019 report, the Army seems to be suggesting that there's something after all to those crazy chemtrail "conspiracy theories."

What's more, the report suggests there's a war up there in near-space going on involving enemy states (aren't they all?) who are seeding clouds to disrupt our weather and may have even (if I read right) fucked up the climate. Could be Russkies or the Chinese. Someone check the labs for spill-overs. Could be the Yanks. Plenty of crazy all around. The report tells us,

United States' cloudseeding techniques used aircraft to disperse lead iodide into the atmosphere above portions of Southeast Asia to create a super-saturated environment during the Vietnamese monsoon season. The increased precipitation produced significant degradation of Vietnamese logistic capabilities as vehicles, carts, and men remained bogged down on certain roadways and paths soaked by nearly continuous rainfall.

Well, goddamn! First UFOs, then cloudseeding chemtrails -- what's next? Will the Pentagon own up to bebopping JFK? Can you imagine the bongulations to be had if Executive Action was right? (Think homo contractus, as Snowden put it in his memoir.)

The report actually gets crazier. Yes, the seeding of the ionosphere by America is due to Russkie activity. Chemtrails ("cloudseeding") are a "response to concerns Russia was beating us in learning how to control the weather and the potential threat that posed to the United States." And then Dr. Strangelove walked in,

[the Russian] use of a nuclear detonation to induce an artificial radiation belt. The consequences of such an event would produce significant and far-reaching impacts to U.S. national security. First, the electromagnetic pulse generated during the initial explosion mimics the disastrous costs produced by a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) induced geomagnetic storm. The United States would witness widespread power grid outages, loss of communication and navigation capabilities, plus long-term modification to the space environment.

Sweet cheeses! Colonial Oil was just the beginning!!

In The Doomsday Machine, Daniel Ellsberg writes of watching Strangelove with a colleague, and afterward,

We came out into the afternoon sunlight, dazed by the light and the film, both agreeing that what we had just seen was, essentially, a documentary.

That's the way I felt after getting through the Appendix of the WCR, like Americans were doomed to forever struggle to get the glove off.

I don't know. I don't want to cast aspersions or golden shower on the suite bed American Democracy once slept in, but, since we don't even bother paying our dues to the UN half the time, we could probably use a good coup right about now, some Philosopher King to come along and 'benignly' set us straight before You Know Who returns with a terrible swift sword and takes no prisoners and damns us all to Hell.

Wouldn't you?


(Article changed on Jul 22, 2021 at 6:50 AM EDT)

 

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John Kendall Hawkins is an American ex-pat freelance journalist and poet currently residing in Australia. His poetry, commentary, and reviews have appeared in publications in Oceania, Europe and the USA, such as Cordite, Morning Star, Hanging (more...)
 

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