Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 75 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Exclusive to OpEdNews:
Life Arts    H4'ed 8/14/20

China: All In All, Just Another BRIC in the Wall

By       (Page 1 of 4 pages)   1 comment, In Series: Book Reviews
Become a Premium Member Would you like to know how many people have read this article? Or how reputable the author is? Simply sign up for a Advocate premium membership and you'll automatically see this data on every article. Plus a lot more, too.
Author 517692
Follow Me on Twitter     Message John Hawkins
Become a Fan
  (3 fans)

Chief of Police: One man cannot move a mountain.

Charlie Chan: No, but two men can start digging.

- Charlie Chan in Shanghai (1935) calling a spade a spade

Fifty years ago, Capitalists Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger initiated their rapprochement with the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) after 25 years of total silence between the world's two leading economic ideologies. America was in a Cold War with the 'SPECTRE' Soviets, but it was a Cold Shoulder they shared with the Chinese. A wall had come up between them. Through backchannels and diplomatic alleyways, the Commie-hating Nixon was invited to come play some ping-pong and shoot the sh*t with Chairman Mao Zedong. Nixon's sudden announcement that he'd be going to China in 1972 was a shocker, election year or not. (What's next, some of us thought, will Tricky be inviting Timothy Leary over at the White House for Quaaludes and cubes?) Fear and Loathing had begun.

Many folks agreed (but not Peter Seeger) that when Nixon went electric with Mao and Chou in February 1972 it was as monumentally meaningful as Mr. Jones's chatfest with Napoleon in rags at the end of Orwell's Animal Farm. Look Left, look Right, tell me what you see. Mao snarked about the American Left-Right in his conversation, calling the Left-Left disingenuous reactionaries (i.e., the pampered middle class). Nixon and Mao and Kissinger and Chou chowed down with bonhomme and good humor, the world was their oyster, on the half shell.

At one point, Mao shot down Nixon's passive aggressive attempt at flattery:

Nixon: I read your book [The Little Red Book]. You moved a nation and changed the world. [Mao looks at Chou, who laughs]

Mao: Oh, I don't know about that. Maybe one neighborhood in Beijing. [Chou laughs so hard, Kissinger manoeuvres das Heimliche]

And soon tiring of Nixon, Mao called it a day:

Mao: I don't feel so well. [the translator almost said, "You make me sick.]

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3  |  4

(Note: You can view every article as one long page if you sign up as an Advocate Member, or higher).

 

Must Read 2   Valuable 2   Well Said 1  
Rate It | View Ratings

John Hawkins Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter Page       Linked In Page       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

John Kendall Hawkins is an American ex-pat freelance journalist and poet currently residing in Australia. His poetry, commentary, and reviews have appeared in publications in Oceania, Europe and the USA, such as Cordite, Morning Star, Hanging (more...)
 

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Follow Me on Twitter     Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Chicago 7: Counter Cultural Learnings of America for Make Money Glorious Nation of Post-Truthvaluestan

Finding the Mother Tree: An Interview with Suzanne Simard

Sonnet: Mother's Day Poem

Dylan at 80: A Sonnet of Appreciation

Assange: "Send Him Back" to Australia

Trump's Coy Mystery: The Kiss of Death

To View Comments or Join the Conversation: