Power of Story Send a Tweet        
OpEdNews Op Eds

Brexit and A Brave New World

By       Message Conn Hallinan       (Page 1 of 4 pages)     Permalink

Related Topic(s): ; ; ; , Add Tags  Add to My Group(s)

Well Said 3   Must Read 2   Supported 2  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H3 11/2/17

Author 76846
Become a Fan
  (11 fans)

From Dispatches From The Edge

From youtube.com: Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn {MID-186743}
Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn
(Image by YouTube, Channel: Guardian Wires)
  Permission   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -

As the clock ticks down on Britain's exit from the European Union, one could not go far wrong casting British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn as the hopeful Miranda in Shakespeare's Tempest: "How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world that has such people in't." And Conservative Party Prime Minister Theresa May as Lady Macbeth: "Out damned spot, out, I say!"

With the French sharpening their knives, the Tories in disarray, the Irish demanding answers, and a scant 17 months to go before Brexit kicks in, the whole matter is making for some pretty good theater. The difficulty is distinguishing between tragedy and farce.

- Advertisement -

The Conservative's Party's Oct. 1-4 conference in Manchester was certainly low comedy. The meeting hall was half empty, and May's signature address was torpedoed by a coughing fit and a prankster who handed her a layoff notice. Then the Tories' vapid slogan "Building a country that works for everyone" fell on to the stage. And several of May's cabinet members were openly jockeying to replace her.

- Advertisement -

In contrast, the Labour Party's conference at Brighton a week earlier was jam packed with young activists busily writing position papers, and Corbyn gave a rousing speech that called for rolling back austerity measures, raising taxes on the wealthy and investing in education, health care and technology.

Looming over all of this is March 2019, the date by which the complex issues involving Britain's divorce from the EU need to be resolved. The actual timeline is even shorter, since it will take at least six months for the European parliament and the EU's 28 members to ratify any agreement.

Keeping all those ducks in a row is going to take considerable skill, something May and the Conservatives have shown not a whit of.

- Advertisement -

The key questions to be resolved revolve around people and money, of which the first is the stickiest.

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3  |  4

 

- Advertisement -

Well Said 3   Must Read 2   Supported 2  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com

Conn M. Hallinan is a columnist for Foreign Policy In Focus, "A Think Tank Without Walls, and an independent journalist. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. He oversaw the (more...)
 

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon Share Author on Social Media   Go To Commenting

The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
- Advertisement -

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Iran Sanctions: War by Other Means

Israel and Syria: Behind the Bombs

Japan Vs. China: Smoke or Fire?

Marching On Moscow

Iran: Rumors Of War

Iran, Israel and the U.S.: The Slide To War