Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 1 Share on Twitter 1 Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Tell A Friend Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites
OpEdNews Op Eds

Blood on the tracks of the New Silk Roads

By       Message Pepe Escobar       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     Permalink    (# of views)   4 comments

Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; , Add Tags
Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 9   Valuable 4   News 3  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H2 6/15/17

Author 73066
Become a Fan
  (182 fans)

From Asia Times

From youtube.com: Gulf countries cut ties with Qatar, accusing it of promoting regional instability. {MID-132826}
Gulf countries cut ties with Qatar, accusing it of promoting regional instability.
(Image by YouTube, Channel: breaking news)
  Permission   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -

China's cardinal foreign policy imperative is to refrain from interfering abroad while advancing the proverbial good relations with key political actors -- even when they may be at each other's throats.

Still, it's nothing but gut-wrenching for Beijing to watch the current, unpredictable, Saudi-Qatari standoff. There's no endgame in sight, as plausible scenarios include even regime change and a seismic geopolitical shift in Southwest Asia -- what a Western-centric view calls the Middle East.

And blood on the tracks in Southwest Asia cannot but translate into major trouble ahead for the New Silk Roads, now rebranded Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

- Advertisement -

Trump's senior staff though maintains that Qatar never came up in discussions with the Saudis. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, former Exxon-Mobil CEO and a certified old Middle East hand, has done his best to defuse the drama -- conscious there would be no reason for Qatar to continue hosting Al Udeid Air Base and Centcom to a hostile superpower.

- Advertisement -

Meanwhile, Russia -- the Beltway's favorite evil entity -- is getting closer and closer to Qatar, ever since the game-changing acquisition in early December by the Qatar Investment Authority (QIA) of 19.5% of the crown energy giant Rosneft.

That translates into an economic/political alliance of the world's top two gas exporters; and that explains why Doha -- still holding a permanent office at NATO's HQ -- has abruptly thrown its "moderate rebels" in Syria under the (economic) bus.

Russia and China are bound by a complex, multi-vector strategic partnership. Beijing, privileging economic interests, takes a pragmatic view and is never inclined to play a political role. As the world's biggest manufacturer and exporter, Beijing's motto is crystal clear: Make Trade, Not War.

But what if Southwest Asia is mired in the foreseeable future in a permanent pre-war footing?

China and BRI's best pal Iran

China is Qatar's top trading partner. Beijing was actively negotiating a free trade agreement with the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) before the current standoff. Moving forward, a possible scenario is Qatar even pulling out of the GCC.

Qatar is also China's second-largest source of liquefied natural gas (LNG), while Saudi Arabia is China's third-largest source of oil. Since 2010 China is ahead of the US as the biggest exporter to Southwest Asia while solidifying its position as the top importer of Southwest Asia energy.

- Advertisement -

When King Salman recently visited Beijing, the House of Saud ecstatically spun a "Sino-Saudi strategic partnership" based on the signing of deals worth $65 billion. The partnership, in fact, hinges on a five-year Saudi Arabia-China security cooperation agreement that includes counter-terrorism and joint military drills. Much will have to do with keeping the profitable Red Sea-Gulf of Aden corridor free of political turmoil.

Of course, eyebrows may be raised over the fact that Saudi Arabia's Wahhabism is the ideological matrix of Salafi-jihadism threatening not only Southwest Asia and the West but also China itself.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 9   Valuable 4   News 3  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com

Pepe Escobar is an independent geopolitical analyst. He writes for RT, Sputnik and TomDispatch, and is a frequent contributor to websites and radio and TV shows ranging from the US to East Asia. He is the former roving correspondent for Asia (more...)
 

Pepe Escobar Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Why Putin is driving Washington nuts

You Want War? Russia is Ready for War

Why Qatar wants to invade Syria

All aboard the New Silk Road(s)

It was Putin's missile?

Where is Prince Bandar?