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Life Arts    H4'ed 10/21/20

Biopic? Shirley, You Jest

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by John Kendall Hawkins

Once a bull hit me across the bridge of my nose and I felt like I was coming apart like a cigarette floating in a urinal. They can hit you on the head and bust your shoes.

- Ralph Ellison, "Hymie's Bull," (1938)

On the evening of August 1, 1943, after breaking bread and pulling corks, talking folklore, jazz and blues, with New Yorker critic Stanley Hyman and novelist Shirley Jackson in their Queens apartment, up-and-coming writer Ralph Ellison said goodnight to them and took the train home to Harlem. When he emerged at 137th Street, he walked right into a raging race riot. Fires, massive looting, chaos.

It had begun in the lobby of a hotel, when a Black woman "improbably named Polite" got into a violent tiff with a white cop, and, when a Black soldier intervened, the cop shot him. According to Ellison biographer Arnold Rampersad, "Margie Polite ran into the street screaming that a white cop had killed a black man. Harlem exploded." Five people died, hundreds were injured, 500 were arrested. The scene inspired artwork, Richard Wright's Notes of a Native Son, and was seared indelibly into Ellison's consciousness. A day later, Ellison was called on by the New York Post to cover the event. He observed, wrote Rampersad, that "it was the poorer element's way of blowing off steam." Other surrealist details of dissociation and mayhem followed.

Hyman and Jackson eventually moved to Bennington, Vermont, where Hyman had landed a position teaching Folklore at the exclusive womens college there. He quickly became a popular professor (no doubt garnering girly titters as soon he wrote his name on the chalkboard), and hosted many parties at his home. Often while the more taciturn Shirley retired early for the night. Hyman was known for his wit, directness, and honesty. Ellison stayed with the couple for a few months and worked on the story "Flying Home" (Jackson biographer Judy Oppenheimer wrote that Hyman virtually forced Ellison to write the story on the spot) -- and the future classic novel of the Black experience in America, Invisible Man. Folklore and music bound Hyman and Ellison together, as well as the common experience of alienation in WASP America (he was Jewish), and Hyman became his trusted penpal and a valued literary advisor throughout his career.

There's extraordinary dramatic tension and a guiding truth combusting about in the paragraphs above -- clear signs of an intense and productive relationship between powerful personages of letters, Hyman and Ellison, and to a lesser extent Jackson -- that would have provided a dynamic beginning to the recently released film, Shirley, the so-called biopic of writer, Shirley Jackson, author of the highly controversial tale, "The Lottery." The movie might have started with the riot (or the railroad Jew being clubbed by "bulls"), but the film production team, including executive producer Martin Scorsese, director Josephine Decker and writer Sarah Gubbins chose a well-trod path, and it definitely made a difference. But not in a good way.

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John Kendall Hawkins is an American ex-pat freelance journalist and poet currently residing in Australia. His poetry, commentary, and reviews have appeared in publications in Oceania, Europe and the USA, such as Cordite, Morning Star, Hanging (more...)
 

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