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I asked some of my Facebook friends about their opinion to the Trayvon Martin verdict

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4. The Newsroom Clerk/stringer

  Where are you from?

Rome, Ga.      

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What race do you identify yourself with?

African American             

Have you followed the Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman Case? If so, are you surprised by the verdict? 

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 I didn't watch the entire trial but I knew about the case. I was initially surprised because I honestly thought that a juror of mothers would be able to relate to a mother who lost her son simply because he was in the wrong place at the wrong time. But after the fact, I realized that if Fla. found Casey Anthony innocent than why not do the same for Zimmerman. The laws in that state need to be reviewed and changed or else more cases like this will continue to occur.  

Did you know Trayvon Martin or do you know George Zimmerman personally? Do you have any ties to the case? If not, do you follow other trials for example: the James Holmes or Jodi Arias trials? Why was this particular trail something you found interesting?

With my job, it's hard not to follow breaking news stories such as James Holmes shooting up a theater or Jodi Arias killing her boyfriend but I can relate to this particular case because I am black and I have a step-son, cousins, nephews, and friends who could have easily been in Trayvon's shoes. Why? Because they are young, black men that may even dress like Trayvon would, i.e. wear a hoodie. Also, some of them are not perfect by any means, but do they still deserve the right to walk home at night while wearing a hoodie, and not be looked at as a suspect? HELL YES THEY DO AND SO DID TRAYVON.

 

Will you volunteer your time to raise awareness over what you feel is an injustice in relation to the outcome of this trial? Why or why not?

If the people who witnessed what happened at the trial can't make a conscious decision to change their actions and way of thinking, then honestly all the volunteering in the world won't do a damn thing. So, I'll answer this question with a quote from the movie "Notorious". "If you want to change the world, we first have to change ourselves". That's how I plan to raise awareness, by working on me and my actions.

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5.  The Nurse:

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