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Sunday Homily: U.S. Christians Shouldn't Be the Most Violent People in the World (But We Are!)

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And how perfect is that? It's the perfection of nature where the sun shines on good and bad alike -- where rain falls on all fields regardless of who owns them. It's the perfection of the God described in this morning's responsorial. According to the psalmist, the Divine One pardons all placing an infinite distance ("as far as east is from west") between sinners and their guilt. God heals all ills and as a loving parent is the very source of human goodness and compassion. That's the perfection that Jesus' followers are called to emulate.

All of that is contrasted with what Paul calls "the wisdom of the world" in today's excerpt from his first letter to the Christian community in Corinth. The world regards turning the other cheek as weakness. Going the extra mile only invites exploitation. Generosity towards legal adversaries will lose you your case in court. Open-handedness towards beggars encourages laziness. Lending without interest is simply bad business. And loving one's enemies is a recipe for military defeat and enslavement.

Yet Paul insists. And he bases his insistence on the conviction that we encounter God in every human individual whether they be our abusers, exploiters, or legal adversaries -- whether they be beggars or debtors unlikely to repay our interest-free loans.

All of those people, Paul points out are "temples of God." God dwells in each of them just as God does in us. In the end, that's the basis of the command we heard in the Leviticus reading, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself."

Normally, our self-centered culture interprets that dictum to mean: (1) we clearly love ourselves above all, so (2) we should love our neighbors as much as we love ourselves.

But in the light of Paul's mystical teaching that God dwells within every human being, the command about neighbor-love takes on much deeper implication. That is, Paul the mystic teaches that our deepest Self is the very God who dwells within each of us as in the Temple. We should therefore love our neighbor (and our enemy, debtor, adversary, and those who beg and borrow from us) because God dwells within them -- because they ARE ourselves. They ARE us! To bomb them, to fight wars against them is therefore suicidal.

No wonder, then, that Paul predicts the destruction of the person who fails to recognize others as temples of God and harms them. Paul means that by destroying others we ipso facto destroy ourselves, because in the end, the God-Self dwelling within us is identical with the Self present in the ones we shoot, bomb and drone. That is a very high mystical teaching. It should be the faith of those pretending to follow Jesus. It should make all of them (all of us!) pacifists.

If we owned that truth, that would be the end of wars. Imagine if the world's 2.2 billion Christians gave up our addiction to violence and simply refused to destroy our fellow human beings because we recognized in them the indwelling presence of God. Imagine if we stopped worshipping the God Jesus rejects -- the "eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth" War God -- and embraced Jesus' compassionate and loving All-Parent.

The resources freed up would be sufficient to literally transform this world into a paradise.

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Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Retired in 2014, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 40 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program. His latest book is "The Magic (more...)
 

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