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Rethinking Conspiracy

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CIA Drug Smuggling: It's no longer a secret that clandestine arms of US Intelligence have profited from running drugs for many years. I first became aware of the issue when a Vietnam veteran claimed he had helped load opium cultivated in Laos onto military transport planes. The opium was turned into heroin and shipped around the world, sometimes in the visceral cavities of dead soldiers. A Hollywood version of these events is portrayed in the film Air America, but the movie is based on historical truth. When the US military presence in Southeast Asia declined and the focus shifted to Central America, cocaine became the new revenue source. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gary Webb ran a well-documented three-part series in the San Jose Mercury News called "Dark Alliance," alleging that traffickers with US intelligence ties had marketed the cocaine in Los Angeles it its new and highly addictive form known as "crack," sparking a scourge that claimed the lives and freedom of thousands. One guy I met in Compton who had been arrested for crack possession described the drug this way: "It doesn't really get you high," he said. "You just want more." Webb's allegations were confirmed by an LAPD Narcotics Officer and whistleblower, Michael Ruppert, and the story received additional confirmation from CIA contract pilot Terry Reed, whose story is revealed in his 1994 book Compromised: Clinton, Bush and the CIA. According to Reed, the sale of cocaine was used to finance the Contras in Central America when congressional funding was blocked by the Boland Amendment. He claimed the operation was run out of Mena, Arkansas when Bill Clinton was governor. Military cargo planes were flown to Central America with military hardware, he said, then returned to Mena loaded with tons of coke.

I could add to the list, and it would be a long one. The Iran-Contra scandal, Watergate, the FBI's Counter Intelligence Program (COINTELPRO), the Tuskegee syphilis experiment--there is no shortage of crimes that were planned and committed by two or more people and thus constituted conspiracy. Conspiracies happen, and before any crime is solved it spawns theories. There are people who look at these theories rationally using logic and discernment, and there are others who are illogical, engage in fallacious and emotion-based thinking, jumping to unjustified conclusions based on little or no evidence. The term "conspiracy theorist," however, has been manipulated to suggest only those in the latter category.

The John Kennedy assassination provides a good example of how the term "conspiracy" is misapplied to disparage people who find fault with official versions of major events. After Kennedy was murdered, very few people questioned the Warren Commission's verdict that Lee Oswald had shot the president unassisted, and anyone who challenged that belief was branded a "conspiracy nut (or buff)" unworthy of respect or consideration. 40 years later, a 2003 Gallup poll revealed that 75% of the US population believed there had been a conspiracy to kill JFK.

Apparently a certain portion of the population has a psychological need to protect themselves from unpleasant realities, so it is easier for such people to label others as conspiracy nuts than to assimilate hard but discomforting facts. In the case of the John Kennedy assassination, even a congressional committee, the House Select Committee on Assassinations, concluded in 1979 that there had been a conspiracy to kill John Kennedy. They tried to soften that reality by calling it a "limited conspiracy," as if Oswald's drunken cousin had helped him and didn't involve elements of US Intelligence, but the fact remains that the US government has officially admitted there had been a conspiracy to assassinate Kennedy. "Conspiracy theorists" were finally vindicated, but I've never heard anyone apologize for disparaging their names and questioning their sanity.

"9/11," of course, is the current topic that yields the most accusations of conspiracy nuttiness. Anyone who challenges the 9/11 Commission's conclusions are branded "conspiracy theorists" (or nuts, wackos or kooks) as were their predecessors when JFK was killed.

History repeats itself.

One of the strange truths about the 9/11 affair is that members of the 9/11 Commission also called the event a conspiracy. That alone shows the term is being intentionally manipulated. In the Commission's view, the conspirators were exclusively fanatical Muslims, but somehow that investigative body has been exempt from accusations of conspiracy theorizing even though they called the event a conspiracy. Apparently one must challenge the official version of events to qualify as a "conspiracy theorist."

I asked Jim Marrs, the popular author and critic of various official versions of history, what he considered to be the origin of "conspiracy" as a derogatory term and how it has been manipulated: "The term 'conspiracy theory' was consciously submitted to assets of the CIA back in a document from the 1960s to be used to counter factual information that was continually being made public regarding the Kennedy assassination. From there, these assets, including media personalities, pundits, academics and government officials, expanded the term to become a pejorative for any statements not complying with the Establishment line," Marrs said. "However, its repetitive overuse, plus the fact that the 9/11 attacks obviously involved a conspiracy, today has lessened the impact of the term."

Many critics of the 9/11 Commission report make some valid points, and it's not fair to simply dismiss them as conspiracy theorists when the very people they're countering also claim there was a conspiracy. The only question is simply: whose conspiracy was it?

Even officials tasked with investigating 9/11 knew there was plenty of deception involved. Senior Counsel to the 9/11 Commission, John Farmer, said on page four of his book The Ground Truth, "At some level of government, at some point in time, there was an agreement not to tell the people the truth about what happened." In their book Without Precedent: The Inside Story of the 9/11 Commission, the two co-chairs of the 9/11 Commission, Lee Hamilton and Thomas Kean, outlined reasons they believe the government established the Commission in a manner that ensured its failure. These reasons included delay in initiating the proceedings, too short a deadline for the scope of the work, insufficient funding, and lack of cooperation by politicians and key government agencies including the Department of Defense, the Federal Aviation Administration, and NORAD. "So there were all kinds of reasons we thought we were set up to fail," the chairmen said.

How much clearer can they be?

Conspiracies exist. They have always existed, and not wanting them to be true does not invalidate their existence. I think it's time we reject the intentional misappropriation of the term "conspiracy" by forces attempting to manipulate public opinion and restore the term to its original and proper meaning. As long as we observe logic and reason, there is no intellectual dishonor in contemplating and discussing conspiracies, and doing so is imperative if we wish to retain our liberty.

(Article changed on September 14, 2014 at 14:05)

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S E Hamilton Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

A teacher and reporter in California.

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