Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Poll Analyses
Share on Facebook 13 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
OpEdNews Op Eds    H3'ed 6/30/15

Nuke deal inches ahead as US-Iran play information war

By       (Page 2 of 3 pages) Become a premium member to see this article and all articles as one long page. (View How Many People Read This)   2 comments
Author 73066
Message Pepe Escobar
Become a Fan
  (186 fans)

Involving the US Senate is a setback to Lausanne, as Iranian diplomats see it; "Imagine if it was it the other way around, with everything waiting for the word of the Iranian Parliament. Western media, instead of silent, would be furious." Spinning the Lausanne fact sheet "created a lot of confusion about Iran's position."

So the Americans throwing a spanner in the works, in this case, means the US Senate rendering obsolete any notion of a deadline such as today's.

Oblivious to reality, media centrifuges keep spinning non-stop. Take the US demand -- three months ago -- to interview 18 scientists and scholars. It was never agreed at the negotiating table in the first place. So even if that disappeared, it was later resurrected to wage a media war.

Other problematic details are merely suppressed. The additional protocol to the agreement has serious parameters. So, for instance, the famous 5c paragraph states that it's up to the country that is being inspected to decide whether to allow access or not. The IAEA cannot pry around computers at will, for instance. It's only entitled to perform environmental sampling.

The sanctions on the Freudian divan

Iran's diplomats are absolutely adamant on changing the "culture of sanctions" -- and the massive, concurrent psychological effect that conditions any company, even in Asia, that decides to do business with Iran. Iranian negotiators advance this might take at least six months of hard work. And they are ready to admit the issue at least is still on the table with the Americans.

There are so many mind-boggling questions to tackle in detail. No one knows yet, for instance, about Iranian liquidity spread across different banks. Iran has arguably $110 billion frozen around the world. Rumors that these funds could be diverted "to proxies" by Tehran are met with derision even by European diplomats.

So what if there's no deal? Zarif already said, on the record, it won't be the end of the world. That's because Iran -- and Iranians -- worked steadily on building a "resistance economy" (and no wonder the Supreme Leader theorized about "heroic flexibility"). As an Iranian official tells it, "the U.S. knows very well that sanctions did not affect Iran. The architects of the Iranian sanctions were sure that Iran would collapse by the end of 2012 at the most. And we would be consumed by social unrest."

None of that happened, of course. So we're back to the media centrifuges madly spinning. Here's a classic, out on the eve of D-Day.

AFP put out a story this Monday titled, US says system reached to allow American access to suspected Iran sites. Iranian officials describe it as "deliberate misinformation to influence the negotiation table." They admit it might be, at best, "an American idea." But this was never negotiated, because it bears no relation with the nuclear issue.

No wonder AFP got a "knock on the door" from the French Foreign Ministry only minutes after the story was out, as Asia Times has learned. In less than an hour, the language was drastically changed, as in "global powers negotiating with Iran have put forward proposals..." By then, the initial -- false -- narrative had gone viral in every major newspaper around the world.

On June 22, also in an AFP piece, the grandstanding Fabius had outlined his three-pointer for a deal; a "robust accord ... that includes limiting Iranian capacity of research and development"; a "verification regime including, if necessary, military sites"; and allowing the "automatic return of sanctions in case of Iranian violations."

The additional protocol does not contemplate any inspection of military sites. The record shows that Iran, twice, and voluntarily, provided access to the military site of Parchin in 2005. And all questions about the site were resolved by the IAEA.

No wonder Iranian officials now harbor "serious doubts about the intentions of those who are pushing for access to defense installations." There are no precedents, except the run-up towards the war on Iraq. In that case, the US government totally despised the IAEA, because the decision to launch Shock and Awe had already been made.

Political will, anybody?

This is just a sample of what Iranian negotiators qualify as "a lot of differences" preventing a deal. Every insider in Vienna knows that the US government spins, "Iran needs the deal" while we, the United States, "want the deal." Iranian officials stress that Lausanne provided the necessary infrastructure for peaceful uranium enrichment, even with severe restrictions. But the US government badly wants Iran to have only "symbolic" enrichment.

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3

(Note: You can view every article as one long page if you sign up as an Advocate Member, or higher).

 

Must Read 2   Interesting 2   Valuable 2  
Rate It | View Ratings

Pepe Escobar Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Pepe Escobar is an independent geopolitical analyst. He writes for RT, Sputnik and TomDispatch, and is a frequent contributor to websites and radio and TV shows ranging from the US to East Asia. He is the former roving correspondent for Asia (more...)
 

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

You Want War? Russia is Ready for War

Why Putin is driving Washington nuts

All aboard the New Silk Road(s)

Why Qatar wants to invade Syria

It was Putin's missile?

Where is Prince Bandar?

To View Comments or Join the Conversation: