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Keep America Safe

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She never openly crossed her mother; nor did the girl question Mrs McMahon's wisdom. Diane merely hid her heart, the stolen makeup, the cigarettes, and her life. The mother lived blissfully, ignorant of who her daughter was, and what she did daily. The two had a good relationship, and seemingly, to this day they do. However, the hurts, just as the haunts, remain unseen.

In Diane's family secrets prevail. Just as a rebellious child, a sibling, a spouse, or a terrorist, people do what they desire to do. No one, not even a firm Mrs McMahon, Mister Obama, Mister Bush, you, or I can control what will come. Indeed, we create it.

When people are presumed to be in need of protection, ultimately, they guard themselves from the protector. Those alleged guilty persons, often prove not to be as they appear to be. Diane enjoyed her hours at home with her parents. She cherished the time they spent together away as well. Yet, there was always unexpressed tension.

Hothouse parenting undermines children in other ways, too, says Anderegg. Being examined all the time makes children extremely self-conscious. As a result they get less communicative; scrutiny teaches them to bury their real feelings deeply. And most of all, self-consciousness removes the safety to be experimental and playful. "If every drawing is going to end up on your parents' refrigerator, you're not free to fool around, to goof up or make mistakes," says Anderegg.

Parental hovering is why so many teenagers are so ironic, he notes. It's a kind of detachment, "a way of hiding in plain sight. They just don't want to be exposed to any more scrutiny."


Infinite inspections, eternal examinations, possible detection did not necessarily stop Diane from engaging in the behaviors her mother feared. Nor would a prohibition or possible penalty inhibit the lass. Threats have no power. As a toddler Dine realized the notion Scott Stewart, Vice President of Tactical Intelligence at the global foundation, Stratfor acknowledges. The security expert advises; regardless of what type of technology is used at airports, or which techniques are employed by "protective parents, creative terrorists, just as tots, teens, and those at any age, will always find ways to get around it.

When asked if airport body scanners can stop terrorist attacks, he said. "Look at prison systems, where searches are far more invasive - they still can't stop contraband from being smuggled into the system," Mister Stewart continues and cautions. Americans tend to rely on technology, "instead of human intelligence."

We might extrapolate. Protective parents depend upon their ability to provide safety and security. Rather than teach self-reliance, nervous caregivers coddle, cosset, and lavish "love" on their little ones. Mothers and fathers create a culture cocooned from harm and believe this is good parenting.

John Portmann, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia has observed, many students, such as Diane, "There is a ritual every university administrator has come to fear." He explains. "Every fall, parents drop off their well-groomed freshmen and within two or three days many have consumed a dangerous amount of alcohol and placed themselves in harm's way. These kids have been controlled for so long, they just go crazy."

Professor Portmann feels the effects of overprotection are even more pernicious. He suggests the whole fabric of society is feeble and fallible when we place our faith in our mother, father, or the Federal government. Portmann is very familiar with what he sees each semester. Young people and their parents become weaker, "more responsive to the herd, too eager to fit in-less assertive, unwilling to disagree with their peers, afraid to question authority, more willing to conform to the expectations of those on the next rung of power above them."

That is, perhaps, the greater threat to the persons who reside on this planet. Most forfeit their personal power....nbsp;People presuppose someone will know what is best. We trust the crowd or the Commander-In-Chief. Most think as the group does. "Evil is everywhere." There are enemies all about." "Terrorists want to kill us." These are considered conventional wisdoms or accepted assumptions....nbsp;However, the paradox is, presumptions become projections. Self-fulfilling prophecies survive. Frequently, these conjectures thrive, while, just as in all other wars, citizens die.

In counterterrorism circles, the standard response to questions about the possibility of future attacks is the terse one-liner: "Not if, but when." This mantra supposedly conveys a realistic approach to the problem, but, as Joseba Zulaika argues in Terrorism, it functions as a self-fulfilling prophecy. By distorting reality to fit their own worldview, the architects of the War on Terror prompt the behavior they seek to prevent-a twisted logic that has already played out horrifically in Iraq. In short, Zulaika contends, counterterrorism has become pivotal in promoting terrorism.

Diane, her deeds, Mrs McMahon sense of doom, and the destructive practice of a protective philosophy affirm what scores of Americans dismiss in the abstract. What we fear most has power. As is oft-stated, what we conceive, and truly believe, will be achieved. Ample research asserts, whether what we imagine is for good or the source of our grief, our conviction can be a cause and an effect. Often we are too close to a situation to see what others easily discern.

To the countless who contemplate traumas such as terrorism and ask, "What next?" There are many possible prospects. We can choose to cultivate a culture that cares rather than works to control or we can continue to rely on a reality that has never been. Americans can have faith that the Commander-In-Chief. "Will Do Everything" or we can accept that, alas, the demon is our own dependency.

References for the reality of resentment, revolt, or insurgent rebels . . .

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I am an Educator, a student of life; I am an Author. On each path I learn from you and with you. Indeed. we all teach and study. Together we advance awareness and acumen. We learn, grow, and glow greater. Please peruse my prose at BeThink.org and (more...)
 
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