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OpEdNews Op Eds    H4'ed 3/27/19

European Union Elections: A Crossroad

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Of course, she also trashes immigrants and Islam, while advocating for a "traditional Christian community" that sounds like Dark Ages Europe.

During the 1990s, the center-left -- the French, Spanish and Greek socialists, the German Social Democrats, and British Labour -- adopted the "market friendly" economic philosophy of neo-liberalism: free trade and globalization, tax cuts for the wealthy, privatization of public resources, and "reforming" the labor market by making it easier to hire and fire employees. The result has been the weakening of trade unions and a shift from long-term stable contracts to short-term "gigs." The latter tend to pay less and rarely include benefits.

Spain is a case in point.

On the one hand, Spain's economy is recovering from the 2008 crash brought on by an enormous real estate bubble. Unemployment has dropped from over 27 percent to 14.5 percent, and the country's growth rate is the highest in the EU.

On the other hand, 90 percent of the jobs created in 2017 were temporary jobs, some lasting only a few days. Wages and benefits have not caught up to pre-crash levels and Spanish workers' share of the national income fell from 63 percent in 2007 to 56 percent today, reflecting the loss in real wages.

Even in France, which still has a fairly robust network of social services, economic disparity is on the rise. From 1950 to 1982, most French workers saw their incomes increase at a rate of 4 percent a year, while the wealth of the elite went up by just 1 percent. But after 1983 -- when neo-liberal economics first entered the continent -- the income for most French workers rose by less than 1 percent a year, while the wealth of the elite increased 100 percent after taxes.

The "recovery" has come about through the systematic lowering of living standards, a sort of reverse globalization: rather than relying on cheap foreign labor in places where trade unions are absent or suppressed, the educated and efficient home grown labor force is forced to accept lower wages and fewer -- if any -- benefits.

The outcome is a growing impoverishment of what was formally considered "middle class" -- a slippery term, but one that the International Labor Organization defines as making an income of between 80 percent and 120 percent of a country's medium income. By that definition, between 23 and 40 percent of EU households fall into it.

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Conn M. Hallinan is a columnist for Foreign Policy In Focus, "A Think Tank Without Walls, and an independent journalist. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. He oversaw the (more...)
 
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