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OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 11/7/15

Bottom Line: Does the TPP Trade Deal "Put American Workers First"?

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Kevin L. Kearns, President of the U.S. Business and Industry Council, in the post "Domestic Manufacturers Call Full Text of Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement a 'Very Bad Deal for America.'" says of this,

"Apparently, one of America's biggest economic problems is that Toyota does not sell enough cars and trucks here, and thus does not displace enough American jobs. The TPP deal allows Toyota and other Japanese automakers a special concession to keep their global supply chains intact."

So the president's singling out of auto workers as benefiting from TPP was unfortunate. They do not, and American auto workers will be hit hard as production moves to China.

In the release statement Obama also wrote, "If you're a worker in Oregon, you're forced to compete against workers in other countries that set lower standards and pay lower wages just to cut their costs."

Does TPP stop the competition of Oregon's workers "against workers in other countries that set lower standards and pay lower wages just to cut their costs" as the president promises here?

The athletic apparel maker Nike is based in Oregon. The workers who actually make Nike's shoes are already all outsourced, already located in countries "that set lower standards and pay lower wages just to cut their costs," including TPP signatories Vietnam (where it employs 345,000 workers), Mexico and Malaysia. TPP will remove tariffs already charged on those shoes and garments as they come into the U.S., making it even more attractive to outsource production to countries "that set lower standards and pay lower wages just to cut their costs." Nike will be rewarded by that tariff cut with greater profits from their choice to outsource.

Meanwhile Nike competitor New Balance has been trying to continue to make shoes in the U.S., and this removal of tariffs is likely to force them to give up. TPP lowers the cost of moving production to countries "that set lower standards and pay lower wages just to cut their costs."

So the president cited autos and Oregon, but a close look reveals these to be unfortunate choices. In both cases American workers are put first -- first in line to be laid off as even more production shifts out of the country.

Does TPP Put American Steelworkers First

If TPP truly puts "American workers first" you'd think that American workers would be happy about TPP. They aren't. The United Steelworkers said of the TPP text:

"'It's a dagger twisting in the heart of American manufacturing,' the USW said in a Nov. 5 statement. 'Even the Wall Street Journal predicted the deal would cause a massive trade deficit in manufacturing, which would result in hundreds of thousands of job losses.'

"The TPP, the union said, provides incentives for U.S. companies to outsource production and send jobs overseas. It would cause dramatic job losses in the U.S. manufacturing sector, and its rules of origin for automobiles and auto parts would allow China to provide the majority of a vehicle's content, it said.

"The TPP also would allow currency manipulation to continue, do nothing to prevent state-owned enterprises from receiving state support and protection, and allow foreign workers to continue to suffer violations of their rights, the USW said."

So it looks like TPP does anything but "putting American workers first." It puts them first in line to be laid off.

Economic Theory

So why the big push for TPP?

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Dave has more than 20 years of technology industry experience. His earlier career included technical positions, including video game design at Atari and Imagic. He was a pioneer in design and development of productivity and educational (more...)
 

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