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OpEdNews Op Eds    H4'ed 6/28/15

American Muslim groups condemn series of terror attacks

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ISIS has claimed responsibility for the bomb blast at the Al-Sadiq mosque in Kuwait's capital. It was the first such attack on a Shiite place of worship in that country.

An attacker in France caused an explosion by plowing his car into a gas factory in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier. A severed head was found staked at the factory entrance.

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve named 35-year-old Yassin Salhi as the main suspect, and said he had been monitored by intelligence agencies between 2006 and 2008 over suspected links to extremist groups. Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins said the suspected attacker, his wife, sister and another person were detained in connection with the attack.

Sajjan Gohel, the international security director for the Asia-Pacific Foundation think tank, was quoted by CNN as saying that the confluence of events add up to "an unprecedented day for terrorism." He noted that, while questions remain about who was responsible and the extent to which the attacks were coordinated, in each case you have individuals "buying into the ... doctrine that groups like ISIS articulate."

While what happened Friday is rare, Gohel told CNN that people worldwide should brace themselves for more such violence.

"Terrorism is something that, unfortunately, we're going to have to accept as part of our daily lives," said Gohel, who is also an Islamist ideology expert at the London School of Economics. "Terrorism is now diffuse: It's not autonomous, it's not necessarily being coordinated by one particular group, (and) it can often be very spontaneous.

"... Gone are the days of the al Qaeda large-scale plots where the cell was big, the authorities could disrupt it, arrest (people) and prosecute. Now are seeing an increase in the volume of terrorism because the plots sometimes actually are on a smaller scale (which makes them) harder to protect, harder to monitor."

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Author and journalist. Author of Islamic Pakistan: Illusions & Reality; Islam in the Post-Cold War Era; Islam & Modernism; Islam & Muslims in the Post-9/11 America. Currently working as free lance journalist. Executive Editor of American (more...)
 
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