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Biological Warfare in Korea: A Review of the Literature

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89 Ibid., p. 162.

90 Ibid., p. 162. Lockwood's source are Endicott and Hagerman, and Dorothy Miller.

91 Research and Development of BW weapons in the UK and Canada preceded US efforts. Both countries were further advanced when the US was invited to observe the Gruinard Island anthrax tests in 1941. The three countries collaborated and shared research during WWII. Lockwood, op. cit., pp. 145146.

92 Ibid., pp. 162163.

93 Ibid., p. 160.

94 Ibid., pp. 160161.

95 Ibid., pp. 172174.

96 Lockwood's source is: William H. Rose, An Evaluation of Entomological Warfare as a Potential Danger to the United States and European NATO Nations, (U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground: U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, 1981), p. 5, available at the Smoking Gun Archive, thesmokinggun.com/archive/mosquitor.html (accessed January 23, 2008).

97 Ruth Rogaski, "Nature, Annihilation, and Modernity, China's Korean War Germ-War-Experience Reconsidered", Journal of Asian Studies, Vol 61, No. 2, May 2002, p. 382.

98 My mother, Sylvia Campbell Powell, who lived in Shanghai from 1945 to 1953, described to me the schoolchildren's flyswatter brigades combing the streets and market stalls of Shanghai in 1952. After flies were swatted, they were collected and incinerated. She also described large 3-panel billboards in graphic cartoon style depicting flies on a bowl of rice, a man eating the rice, the same man squatting with his pants around his knees suffering projectile diarrhea and vomit.

99 Judith Shapiro, Mao's War Against Nature: Politics and the Environment in Revolutionary China, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001.

100 Mark Wheelis, Lajos Rózsa, and Malcolm Dando, eds., Deadly Cultures: Biological Weapons Since 1945, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 2006.

101 John Ellis van Courtland Moon, "The US Biological Weapons Program," in Mark Wheelis, Lajos Rózsa, and Malcolm Dando, eds., Deadly Cultures, op. cit., p. 30.

102 Ibid., pp. 1011.

103 Martin Furmanski and Mark Wheelis, "Allegations of Biological Weapons Use," in Mark Wheelis, Lajos Rózsa, and Malcolm Dando, eds., Deadly Cultures: Biological Weapons since 1945, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2006, pp. 256257.

104 Ibid., p. 256.

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Tom is a founding member of the Bioweapon Truth Commission (BWTC). You should access its Global Online Library (GOL) to learn more about how Western empire conducts "business" at home and abroad ( (more...)
 
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Biological Warfare in Korea: A Review of the Literature