Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 4 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Best Web OpEds    H3'ed 9/23/21

Pandemic Shipping Delays: Why Deliveries Are So Slow - The Atlantic

Quicklink Submitted By   1 comment, 12 series
Become a Premium Member Would you like to know how many people have read this article? Or how reputable the author is? Simply sign up for a Advocate premium membership and you'll automatically see this data on every article. Plus a lot more, too.
Author 40790
Follow Me on Twitter     Message Susan Lee Schwartz
Become a Fan
  (23 fans)

"These app delivery services are at best an economic mirage and at worst expanding misery by making it too easy to ignore their true cost — financial, human and community — in the name of convenience;  they pay for themselves partly by squeezing more from the people with the least power in the transaction. Most of these companies are now trying to buy out competitors, raise prices, or squeeze couriers or restaurants for better terms. Or they are hoping that the companies’ economics stink less as they deliver more types of goods and bigger orders. A series of articles this week and an investigation  painted a picture of impossible demands on delivery workers for a multitude of app-based services."

Read the rest of the story HERE:

At www.theatlantic.com

 

Rate It | View Ratings

Susan Lee Schwartz Social Media Pages: Facebook Page       Twitter Page       Linked In Page       Instagram Page

I began teaching in 1963,; Ba and BS in Education -Brooklyn College. I have the equivalent of 2 additional Master's, mainly in Literacy Studies and Graphic Design. I was the only seventh grade teacher of English from 1990 -1999 at East Side (more...)
 

Related Topic(s): ; ; ; , Add Tags
Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Follow Me on Twitter     Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Other Series: View All 885 Articles in "Shameful"

Other Series: View All 1074 Articles in "Public ignorance & those who use this"

Other Series: View All 497 Articles in "PRIVITIZATION."

Other Series: View All 56 Articles in "Pandemic"

Other Series: View All 317 Articles in "our society changes for the worse"

Other Series: View All 426 Articles in "Insanity AFOOT!"

Other Series: View All 756 Articles in "DON'T MISS THIS!"

Other Series: View All 491 Articles in "Dangerous"

Other Series: View All 918 Articles in "Access: the POWER of MONEY"

Comments

The time limit for entering new comments on this quicklink has expired.

This limit can be removed. Our paid membership program is designed to give you many benefits, such as removing this time limit. To learn more, please click here.

1 people are discussing this page, with 1 comments


Susan Lee Schwartz

Become a Fan
Author 40790
Follow Me on Twitter
(Member since Oct 25, 2009), 23 fans, 20 articles, 4692 quicklinks, 8722 comments, 2 diaries (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook Page Twitter Page Linked In Page Instagram Page

  New Content

The most significant innovation of these apps is obscuring the true cost of convenience. We are learning to expect everything fast and easy and not think about the toll that takes on people and our communities.

More recently, delivery companies that make even less sense have sprouted everywhere. In 2015 Uber rides seemed impossibly cheap, yet now companies like Gopuff, Dija, Getir and Jokr my spell check protested at these names promise to deliver a pint of ice cream and condoms in 10 minutes or less.

These companies operate something like little 7-Elevens, except they absorb the cost of both buying products and sending a guy on a scooter to your home. This might make sense if people were paying for the privilege of skipping the store, but the fees or markup on products are relatively minimal. How?

Two answers: They are subsidized by eager investment firms for now, as Uber and others were for years. And, like other app-based delivery services, they pay for themselves partly by squeezing more from the people with the least power in the transaction.

A series of articles this week from Rest of World, and an investigation from The Verge and New York Magazine, painted a picture of impossible demands on delivery workers for a multitude of app-based services.

Low-wage work has always been precarious, and more affluent people benefit from that in the form of cheaper products and services. But app-delivery couriers are compelled to continually do more work, faster and for less money or fall out of favor with the computer programs that assign the best jobs.

Maybe this work could improve, voluntarily or by force. And it's possible that labor shortages and courier demands might compel app companies to improve working conditions.

Submitted on Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 3:06:50 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

 
Want to post your own comment on this Quicklink? Post Comment