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Quotations by Tag for Human Nature

Tag: "Human Nature"      Page 1 of 1

To ask that human nature be infallible and incorruptible is to ask the winds to be motionless.

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Joseph Joubert

* My faith in human dignity consists in the belief that man is the greatest scamp on earth. Human dignity must be associated with the idea of a scamp and not with that of an obedient, disciplined and regimented soldier.
o Ch. I : The Awakening

* I am doing my best to glorify the scamp or vagabond. I hope I shall succeed. For things are not so simple as they sometimes seem. In this present age of threats to democracy and individual ...
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Lin Yutang Lin Yutang (October 10, 1895 - March 26, 1976) was a Chinese writer and inventor. His informal but polished style in both Chinese and English made him one of the most influential writers of his generation, and his compilations and translations of classic Chinese texts into English were bestsellers in the West.

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In my opinion, an autocratic system of coercion soon degenerates; force attracts men of low morality... The really valuable thing in the pageant of human life seems to me not the political state, but the creative, sentient individual, the personality; it alone creates the noble and the sublime, while the herd as such remains dull in thought and dull in feeling.
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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics. For this achievement, Einstein is often regarded as the father of modern physics and one of the most prolific intellects in human history. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory within physics. Near the beginning of his career, Einstein thought that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to reconcile the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field. This led to the development of his special theory of relativity. He realized, however, that the principle of relativity could also be extended to gravitational fields, and with his subsequent theory of gravitation in 1916, he published a paper on the general theory of relativity. He continued to deal with problems of statistical mechanics and quantum theory, which led to his explanations of particle theory and the motion of molecules. He also investigated the thermal properties of light which laid the foundation of the photon theory of light. In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the structure of the universe as a whole.

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The World As I See It" by Einstein


Einstein at his home in Princeton, New Jersey
"How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people -- first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unkno...
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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics. For this achievement, Einstein is often regarded as the father of modern physics and one of the most prolific intellects in human history. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory within physics. Near the beginning of his career, Einstein thought that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to reconcile the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field. This led to the development of his special theory of relativity. He realized, however, that the principle of relativity could also be extended to gravitational fields, and with his subsequent theory of gravitation in 1916, he published a paper on the general theory of relativity. He continued to deal with problems of statistical mechanics and quantum theory, which led to his explanations of particle theory and the motion of molecules. He also investigated the thermal properties of light which laid the foundation of the photon theory of light. In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the structure of the universe as a whole.

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The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon,
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers,
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; (1)
So might ...
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William Wordsworth William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 - 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads. Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semiautobiographical poem of his early years which the poet revised and expanded a number of times. The work was posthumously titled and published, prior to which it was generally known as the poem "to Coleridge". Wordsworth was England's Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death in 1850.

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When you listen to the otherwordly voice of Robert Johnson hitting those words "Blues Falling Down Like Hail" or Howlin' Wolf riding the rhythm of "Spoonful" with such amazing ease and more than living up to his name at the same time, or Skip James lamenting love, the worst of all human afflictions, in "Devil Got My Woman" or Son House hugging the memory of his dead lover for dear life in the tightly coiled "Death Letter Blues" you're hearing som...
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Martin Scorsese Martin C. Scorsese is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, actor, and film historian. He is the founder of the World Cinema Foundation and a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award for his contributions to the cinema, and has won awards from the Oscars, Golden Globe, BAFTA, and Directors Guild of America. Scorsese is president of The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to film preservation.

Scorsese's body of work addresses such themes as Italian American identity, Roman Catholic concepts of guilt and redemption, machismo, and violence. Scorsese is widely considered to be one of the most significant and influential American filmmakers of his era, directing landmark films such as Taxi Driver, Raging Bull and Goodfellas "" all of which he collaborated on with actor and close friend Robert De Niro. He won the Academy Award for Best Director for The Departed and earned an MFA in film directing from the New York University Tisch School of the Arts.

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There is a kind of globe you can buy for hour home or office. With the light inside turned off you see the crazy-quilt pattern of the world's political areas. Turn the light on and there appears a glowing map of the natural Earth -- the bottoms of oceans and seas, the tops of mountains and plains, deserts and jungles, glaciers and volcanoes.
This map shows no city limits, no county or state lines, no national borders. The only things that seems ...
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Don Fabun

It seems we cannot manage without an enemy. The figure of the enemy cannot be abolished from the processes of civilization. The need is second nature even to a man of peace. In his case the image of the enemy is simply shifted from a human object to a natural or social force [or vice versa] that in some way threatens us and has to be defeated, whether it be [terrorism, communism], capitalistic exploitation, environmental pollution, or even thi...
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Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco, OMRI (Italian: [umˈbɛrto ˈɛko]; born 5 January 1932) is an Italian semiotician, essayist, philosopher, literary critic, and novelist. He is best known for his groundbreaking 1980 historical mystery novel Il nome della rosa (The Name of the Rose), an intellectual mystery combining semiotics in fiction, biblical analysis, medieval studies and literary theory. He has since written further novels, including Il pendolo di Foucault (Foucault's Pendulum) and L'isola del giorno prima (The Island of the Day Before). His most recent novel Il cimitero di Praga (The Prague Cemetery), released in 2010, was a best-seller.

Eco has also written academic texts, children's books and many essays. He is founder of the Dipartimento di Comunicazione (Department of Media Studies) at the University of the Republic of San Marino, President of the Scuola Superiore di Studi Umanistici (Graduate School for the Study of the Humanities), University of Bologna, member of the Accademia dei Lincei (since November 2010), and an Honorary Fellow of Kellogg College, University of Oxford.

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God knows how difficult it is to be a human.



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Mother Meera Born in Chandepalle a small village in Nalgonda district of Andhra Pradesh, India, she had her first samādhi, a state of complete spiritual absorption, at the age of six, which lasted for a whole day.[2] When she was 12 her uncle Bulgur Venkat Reddy met her for the first time, and immediately recognised in her the girl of his visions. He became convinced that she is the Divine Mother and started to take care of her, allowing her to unfold her inner experiences. Her parents Antamma and Veera Reddy live in Madanapalle, Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh[3]

In 1974, Reddy brought Mother Meera to the Sri Aurobindo Ashram in Puducherry, India, of which he was a member.[4] There she first met Westerners and started to give Darshan. She is however not associated with the Sri Aurobindo Ashram today. In 1979 she was invited by her first devotees to Canada, where she went several times. Meanwhile Reddy's health started to deteriorate.

In 1981 she made her first trip to West Germany, where she, together with Reddy and her close companion Adilakshmi, settled down a year later. She married a German in 1982. Reddy died in 1985 and was buried in the local cemetery in Dornburg-Thalheim, Hesse.[5] For some years now, she has been giving Darshan (literally seeing, primarily in a spiritual context) at Schloss Schaumburg in Balduinstein, a small town in Germany. Previously, in the early 1990s, she gave Darshan in a house in the town of Thalheim, some 5 km northwest of Hadamar in Germany. She also visits the United States on a regular basis (see links below).

Truly a work of Art is one that tells us,
that Nature cannot make what man can make.



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Louis Kahn Date of Birth: 1901
Date of Death: 1974
Country: United States
Bio: Louis Isadore Kahn (born Itze-Leib Schmuilowsky) (March 5 [O.S. February 20] 1901 - March 17, 1974) was an American architect, based in Philadelphia. After working in various capacities for several firms in Philadelphia, he founded his own atelier in 1935. While continuing his private practice, he served as a design critic and professor of architecture at Yale School of Architecture from 1947 to 1957.

From 1957 until his death, he was a professor of architecture at the School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania. Kahn created a style that was monumental and monolithic; his heavy buildings do not hide their weight, their materials, or the way they are assembled. Louis Kahn's works are considered as monumental beyond modernism. Famous for his meticulously built works, his provocative proposals that remained unbuilt, and his teaching, Kahn was one of the most influential architects of the twentieth century. He was awarded the AIA Gold Medal and the RIBA Gold Medal. At the time of his death he was considered by some as "America's foremost living architect."


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