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Tag: "Science"      Page 1 of 1

Mopping-up operations are what engage most scientists throughout their careers. ...No part of the aim of normal science is to call forth new sorts of phenomena; indeed those that will not fit the box are often not seen at all. Nor do scientists normally aim to invent new theories, and they are often intolerant of those invented by others. Instead, normal-scientific research is directed to the articulation of those phenomena and theories that the ...
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Thomas S. Kuhn

The most important function of art and science is to awaken the cosmic religious feeling and keep it alive.

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Einstein

The kids I teach, after all, are the ones who will assume the real power, in their earlier years serving their apprenticeship in a diocese and later, when they're in their sixties or so, becoming either rich but powerless senators or rich and more powerful governors. At that stage their mark of achievement will be an almost universal inability to move one's body around except in those ornate powered wheelchairs. Like so many other things that h...
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Bruce Powe

Author Information from Wikipedia

The World As I See It" by Einstein


Einstein at his home in Princeton, New Jersey
"How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people -- first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unkno...
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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics. For this achievement, Einstein is often regarded as the father of modern physics and one of the most prolific intellects in human history. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory within physics. Near the beginning of his career, Einstein thought that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to reconcile the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field. This led to the development of his special theory of relativity. He realized, however, that the principle of relativity could also be extended to gravitational fields, and with his subsequent theory of gravitation in 1916, he published a paper on the general theory of relativity. He continued to deal with problems of statistical mechanics and quantum theory, which led to his explanations of particle theory and the motion of molecules. He also investigated the thermal properties of light which laid the foundation of the photon theory of light. In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the structure of the universe as a whole.

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It is the first duty of a hypothesis to be intelligible.
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Thomas Henry Huxley

...[he] was as much enchanted by the rudiments of algebra as he would have been if I had given him an engine worked by steam, with a methylated spirit lamp to heat the boiler; more enchanted, perhapsfor the engine would have got broken, and, remaining always itself, would in any case have lost its charm, while the rudiments of algebra continued to grow and blossom in his mind with an unfailing luxuriance. Every day he made the discovery of someth...
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Thomas Henry Huxley

I admit that mathematical science is a good thing. But excessive devotion to it is a bad thing.

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Aldous Huxley

The mathematician starts with a few propositions, the proof of which is so obvious that they are called selfevident, and the rest of his work consists of subtle deductions from them. The teaching of languages, at any rate as ordinarily practised, is of the same general nature authority and tradition furnish the data, and the mental operations are deductive.

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Thomas Henry Huxley

This seems to be one of the many cases in which the admitted accuracy of mathematical processes is allowed to throw a wholly inadmissible appearance of authority over the results obtained by them. Mathematics may be compared to a mill of exquisite workmanship, which grinds your stuff of any degree of fineness; but, nevertheless, what you get out depends on what you put in; and as the grandest mill in the world will not extract wheat flour from pe...
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Thomas Henry Huxley


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