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Quotations by Tag for Nothingness

Tag: "Nothingness"      Page 1 of 1

Nothing is given to Man.
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Unknown Research useless.

We don't see things as THEY are, we see things as WE are.
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Unknown Research useless.

May i suggest for the new year avoiding all tittles such as liberals, rep, demo, progressives, races, color, educational idiots,etc. and come to a realistic confederation of humanistic individuals understanding and taking over this country and changing it to a better, healthier, educated, spiritual, hard working, united place to breath in. love and light." (Wisest words I've heard this morning.)
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Dorothy Lemus

Only a few arrive at nothing, because the road is long.
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Antonio Porchia Antonio Porchia was born in Italy in 1886 and died in Argentina in 1968. He lived in Buenos Aires from 1911 until his death, writing in Spanish and working as a potter and carpenter.

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Email Footnote: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
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Source Unknown

All that is needed for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing. --- Edmund Burke
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Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke PC (12 January 1729 - 9 July 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher who, after relocating to England, served for many years in the House of Commons of Great Britain as a member of the Whig party. He is mainly remembered for his opposition to the French Revolution. It led to his becoming the leading figure within the conservative faction of the Whig party, which he dubbed the "Old Whigs", in opposition to the pro-French-Revolution "New Whigs" led by Charles James Fox. Burke lived before the terms "conservative" and "liberal" were used to describe political ideologies. Burke was praised by both conservatives and liberals in the nineteenth-century and since the twentieth-century he has generally been viewed as the philosophical founder of modern conservatism.

Hence all things being caused and causing, aided and aiding, mediate and immediate, and all inter-connected by a natural and imperceptible tie that unites the remotest and most diverse, I hold it impossible to know the parts without knowing the whole, any more than to know the whole without knowing the particular parts.
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Blaise Pascal

Blaise Pascal (June 19, 1623, in Clermont-Ferrand, France - August 19, 1662, in Paris) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a civil servant. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the construction of mechanical calculators, the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalizing the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote in defense of the scientific method.

Pascal was a mathematician of the first order. He helped create two major new areas of research. He wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of sixteen, and later corresponded with Pierre de Fermat on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science. Following Galileo and Torricelli, in 1646 he refuted Aristotle's followers who insisted that nature abhors a vacuum. His results caused many disputes before being accepted.

We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are.
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Anais Nin


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