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Tag: "Trust"      Page 1 of 1

Repair the Way for the Law'ed
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Our Father http://www.shootguns.info/maker.htm

Struggle to trust what your unconscious is up to, no matter how bizarre, how forbidden, how complex. The main characteristic of creative persons is an enormous tolerance for ambiguity. Permit yourself not to know. You are writing the story to find out what happens and why.

Since the story is writing itself, you can’t know the ending, You can’t know the middle. You might not know the beginning.

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Robert Burdette Sweet

We could manage to survive without money changers and
stockbrokers. We should find it harder to do without miners,
steel workers and those who cultivate the land.
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Bevan Aneurin

They talk about the people, but they do not trust them; and trusting the people is the indispensable precondition for revolutionary change.

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Paulo Freire from wikipedia
Paulo Freire contributed a philosophy of education that came not only from the more classical approaches stemming from Plato, but also from modern Marxist and anti-colonialist thinkers. In fact, in many ways his Pedagogy of the Oppressed may be best read as an extension of, or reply to, Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth, which emphasized the need to provide native populations with an education which was simultaneously new and modern (rather than traditional) and anti-colonial (not simply an extension of the culture of the colonizer).



Freire is best-known for his attack on what he called the "banking" concept of education, in which the student was viewed as an empty account to be filled by the teacher. The basic critique was not new — Rousseau's conception of the child as an active learner was already a step away from tabula rasa (which is basically the same as the "banking concept"), and thinkers like John Dewey were strongly critical of the transmission of mere "facts" as the goal of education. Freire's work, however, updated the concept and placed it in context with current theories and practices of education, laying the foundation for what is now called critical pedagogy.



More challenging is Freire's strong aversion to the teacher-student dichotomy. This dichotomy is admitted in Rousseau and constrained in Dewey, but Freire comes close to insisting that it should be completely abolished.

Let life happen to you. Believe me: life is in the right, always.

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Rainer Maria Rilke

Making sense of you is a puzzle I need to solve.
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Alva Noe

You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

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Ghandi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: મોહનદાસ કરમચંદ ગાંધી, ; 2 October 1869 - 30 January 1948) was the pre-eminent political and spiritual leader of India during the Indian independence movement. He was the pioneer of satyagraha"�resistance to tyranny through mass civil disobedience, firmly founded upon ahimsa or total nonviolence"�which led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. Gandhi is commonly known around the world as Mahatma Gandhi (Sanskrit: महात्मा mahātmā or "Great Soul", an honorific first applied to him by Rabindranath Tagore), and in India also as Bapu (Gujarati: બાપુ, bāpu or "Father"). He is officially honoured in India as the Father of the Nation; his birthday, 2 October, is commemorated there as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Non-Violence.

Gandhi first employed non-violent civil disobedience while an expatriate lawyer in South Africa, during the resident Indian community's struggle for civil rights. After his return to India in 1915, he organized protests by peasants, farmers, and urban labourers concerning excessive land-tax and discrimination. After assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns to ease poverty, expand women's rights, build religious and ethnic amity, end untouchability, and increase economic self-reliance. Above all, he aimed to achieve Swaraj or the independence of India from foreign domination. Gandhi famously led his followers in the Non-cooperation movement that protested the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (240 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930. Later he campaigned against the British to Quit India. Gandhi spent a number of years in jail in both South Africa and India.

A man can only see by his own lamp; but he can walk in the light of other men's.

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Joseph Joubert

Credulity is the mark of good nature.

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Joseph Joubert

It is more dishonourable to distrust our friends than to be deceived by them.
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La Rochefoucauld Antoine de la Rochefoucauld, the second of this name, Seigneur de Chaumont-sur-Loire, served Louis I de Bourbon, prince de Condé as a knight (chevalier de l'ordre du Roi) and his chamberlain. 7 October 1552, he married Cécile de Montmirail, daughter of Étienne de Montmirail, seigneur de Chambourcy, maître des Requêtes and Louise de Selve.

He fought at the Battle of Jarnac on 13 March 1569, where the Prince de Condé was killed, and succeeded to withdraw his troops to Cognac. Charged by Gaspard de Coligny, he then took Nontron, 8 June.

Trust in God, and keep your powder dry.
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Oliver Cromwell Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 - 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader and later Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland. Born into the middle gentry, he was relatively obscure for the first 40 years of his life. After undergoing a religious conversion in the 1630s, Cromwell became an independent puritan, taking a generally (but not completely) tolerant view towards the many Protestant sects of his period. An intensely religious man - a self-styled Puritan Moses - he fervently believed that God was guiding his victories.

He was elected Member of Parliament for Huntingdon in 1628 and for Cambridge in the Short (1640) and Long (1640-49) Parliaments. He entered the English Civil War on the side of the "Roundheads" or Parliamentarians. Nicknamed "Old Ironsides", he was quickly promoted from leading a single cavalry troop to become one of the principal commanders of the New Model Army, playing an important role in the defeat of the royalist forces.

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