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Pleasure      Page 1 of 1

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The mere joy of living is so immense in Walt Whitman's veins that it abolishes the possibility of any other kind of feeling.

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William James

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As in all arts the enjoyment increases with the knowledge of the art, but people will know the first time they go, if they go open-mindedly and only feel those things they actually feel and not the things they think they should feel, whether they will care for the bullfights or not.
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Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American writer and journalist. He was part of the 1920s expatriate community in Paris, and one of the veterans of World War I later known as "the Lost Generation." He received the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 for The Old Man and the Sea, and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. (Wikipedia)

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We live in the midst of conjunctures so strange that the old are as inexperienced as the young. We are all novices, where all is new.

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Joseph Joubert

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As the mind, hastily and without choice, imbibes and treasures up first notices of things, from whence all the rest proceed, errors must forever prevail, and remain uncorrected, either by the natural powers of the understanding or the assistance of logic; for the original notions being vitiated, confused and inconsiderately taken from things, and the secondary ones formed no less rashly, human knowledge itself, the thing employed in all our res...
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Francis Bacon

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As the mind, hastily and without choice, imbibes and treasures up first notices of things, from whence all the rest proceed, errors must forever prevail, and remain uncorrected, either by the natural powers of the understanding or the assistance of logic; for the original notions being vitiated, confused and inconsiderately taken from things, and the secondary ones formed no less rashly, human knowledge itself, the thing employed in all our res...
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Francis Bacon

 

 
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