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January 4, 2013

100 billion alien planets fill our galaxy: study

By Kyle McDermott

Our Milky Way galaxy is home to at least 100 billion alien planets, and possibly many more, a new study suggests. "It's a staggering number, if you think about it," lead author Jonathan Swift, of Caltech in Pasadena, said in a statement. "Basically there's one of these planets per star." "I usually try not to call things 'Rosetta stones,' but this is as close to a Rosetta stone as anything I've seen," said co-author John Johnson, also of Caltech. "It's like unlocking a language that we're trying to understand -- the language of planet formation." Because the Kepler-32 star is smaller and less luminous than our sun, the five planets are likely not as heat-blasted as their tight orbits might imply. In fact, the outermost planet in the system appears to lie in the habitable zone, a range of distances that could support the existence of liquid water on a world's system.

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Our Milky Way galaxy is home to at least 100 billion alien planets, and possibly many more, a new study suggests. "It's a staggering number, if you think about it," lead author Jonathan Swift, of Caltech in Pasadena, said in a statement. "Basically there's one of these planets per star." "I usually try not to call things 'Rosetta stones,' but this is as close to a Rosetta stone as anything I've seen," said co-author John Johnson, also of Caltech. "It's like unlocking a language that we're trying to understand -- the language of planet formation." Because the Kepler-32 star is smaller and less luminous than our sun, the five planets are likely not as heat-blasted as their tight orbits might imply. In fact, the outermost planet in the system appears to lie in the habitable zone, a range of distances that could support the existence of liquid water on a world's system.

Submitters Website: http://transudationism.blogspot.com/

Submitters Bio:

Kyle McDermott is a commentator and essayist. He advocates self-determination, freedom, and independence for all of the Peoples of mankind and respect and empathy for all living things, and he therefore believes in the cosmic Brotherhood of Sentience. In his writings, he has attempted to offer a new worldview, for the reasoned consideration of anyone willing to consider his hypothesis with an open mind, namely: the "Big Bang" is most rationally perceived as an autotelic cosmic seed, and the universe is best understood as a living organism.

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