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September 3, 2013

Congress and the Imperial Presidency Debate Syria

By Lawrence Davidson

The notion that the President of the United States, with or without Congressional approval, has the authority to act as the world's "policeman" and punish violators of international laws, that it itself flaunts, is offensive and dangerous. Let's hope that Congress listens to the people this time around and tells the President to keep his cruise missiles to himself.

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Source: To The Point Analyses


Part I -- The President Goes to Congress  

President Obama has sidestepped the political hole he had dug for himself (what we might call the "red line" hole) over his proposed attack on Syria. Having insisted there must be "consequences" for a breach of international law, specifically the alleged use of banned chemical weapons by the Syrian government, he was faced with both popular American reluctance to support military action and Congressional pique over not being included in the decision process.  

As a consequence President Obama announced on 31 August 2013 that he now supports a Congressional debate and vote on the issue of attacking Syria. Then he told us how he sees the situation, "This [Syrian chemical] attack is an assault on human dignity... It risks making a mockery of the global prohibition on the use of chemical weapons... Ultimately this is not about who occupies this [White House] office at any given time, its about who we are as a country."   

Part II -- The U.S. and Chemical Weapons  

For all I know, the president really believes his own words, but I am pretty sure his implied question of "who we are as a country" is meant to be rhetorical. If one was to give an evidence-based answer to that inquiry, as it relates to chemical weapons, it would be embarrassing in the extreme. Lest we forget, the U.S. defoliated parts of Vietnam with a chemical weapon called Agent Orange and by its use killed a lot more than large swaths of jungle. Agent Orange killed and maimed an estimated 400,000 Vietnamese and an estimated half a million children have subsequently been born deformed. It also did a fatal job on many of the American troops that handled the stuff.

Later, the U.S. sold chemical and biological weapons-grade material to Saddam Hussein and followed up by helping his army aim the stuff accurately at Iranian troops. Saddam also used it on the Iraqi Kurds. Then there is the fact that our "very special friend," Israel, used phosphorous bombs (a banned chemical weapon) on the civilians of Gaza. At the time Israel did this, President Obama occupied the oval office. I don't remember him displaying any moral angst or positioning U.S. ships in the eastern Mediterranean with cruise missiles aimed at Israeli airbases. The truth is that during all of these episodes, no one in the government worried (at least publicly) about what our actions or lack thereof, said about what sort of country this is.  

However, this question does deserve a direct answer. What sort of country is the U.S. in relation to the use of chemical weapons? The kindest answer one can give is it is a bloody hypocritical nation.   

Part III -- Back to Congress  

Nonetheless, sending the issue of a possible attack on Syria to Congress is a timely political move for the president. It puts off having to face the dilemma of taking military action that cannot both constitute meaningful punishment for the violation of international law and, at the same time, keeps the U.S. from becoming ever more deeply embroiled in the Syrian civil war.  

It also could be a good political move for the U.S. as a whole because it creates a good precedent. Having Congress debate and vote on the issue of military action against Syria could help resuscitate the moribund War Powers Act. Although Obama claims he has the authority to launch an attack no matter what Congress decides, he would be politically hard pressed to do so if the legislators said don't do it. Thus the maneuver might narrow the otherwise rapidly expanding powers of the imperial presidency. Of course, none of this means that Congress can't be scared or otherwise bamboozled into giving the president the power to do something militarily stupid. Vietnam and Iraq stand as powerful precedents in that regard.  

There is another very interesting potential consequence of the president's going to Congress. It might create a situation where there is a publicly noticeable difference between the express desires of a majority of the voting population and the special interests now encouraging military action against Syria. In my last analysis I laid out the idea that in the interim between elections, the influence of powerful special interests have much more to say about policy than do the voters, most of whom pay little attention to foreign policy. Now, however, we have a rare moment when the populace is paying attention and polls indicate that a healthy majority does not want further intervention in the Middle East. Who will the Congress respond to in the upcoming debate and vote, their special interest constituents or the voting kind?  

Part IV -- Conclusion  

Of course, the notion that the President of the United States, with or without Congressional approval, has the authority to act as the world's "policeman" and punish violators of international laws, that it itself flaunts, is offensive and dangerous. There are international institutions in place such as the International Criminal Court (ICC) that, imperfect as they are, can be used to prosecute violations such as the use of banned weapons. (It is to be noted that the cause of "human dignity" would be greatly advanced if the U.S. would stop refusing to ratify the treaty empowering the ICC).  

How do you characterize a situation where one or a small number of community members takes it upon themselves to go outside the law to punish alleged wrongdoers? Here in the U.S. this is known as "vigilante justice." Most often this sort of behavior results in a "lynching" based on little or no reliable evidence.  

President Obama's going to Congress will not change the vigilante nature of U.S. intentions. Let's just hope that Congress listens to the people this time around and tells the President to keep his cruise missiles to himself. And then, lets hope he does just that.



Submitters Website: http://www.tothepointanalyses.com

Submitters Bio:

Lawrence Davidson is a history professor at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. He is the author of Foreign
Policy Inc.: Privatizing America's National Interest
; America's
Palestine: Popular and Offical Perceptions from Balfour to Israeli
Statehood
; and Islamic Fundamentalism. His academic work is focused on the history of American foreign relations with the Middle East. He also teaches courses in the history of science and modern European intellectual history.

His blog To The Point Analyses now has its own Facebook page. Along with the analyses, the Facebook page will also have reviews, pictures, and other analogous material.

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