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Life Arts

Review: "Capitalism: A Love Story" is High Art, Demands Action from Americans

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Moore's magnum opus comes to an end with a sequence of Obama riling up citizens for "hope and change." Shots of individuals taking on the recession, shots of people refusing to let capitalism take away basic needs that are necessary for survival, and shots of workers championing democracy in the workplace end the film on a high note.

The idea of democracy in the workplace was emboldened by the presence of the Republic Windows workers whose story was featured in the film. Moore and his crew were the only media allowed in to the factory during the sit-in. It is evident that the workers trusted Moore as an ally who would give voice to their values and a few of the workers choose to thank him personally during the Q&A.

The audience participating in the Q&A showed signs of increasing skepticism for Obama. Chicago might be "Obamaland," but the engaged working class of Chicago knew even more clearly after seeing Moore's film that Obama has been conducting policy for the richest 1% at the expense of the poor, working, and middle classes of America.

Moore indicated that he found the appointment of Timothy Geithner to Secretary of Treasury and the naming of Larry Summers as an adviser to be very unsettling. Instead of being properly critical of Obama, he chose to apply twisted logic to the situation and argue that big banks hire bank robbers to help them prevent banks from being robbed and so, perhaps, Obama hired Geithner, Summers, and others closely linked to the banking industry so they could tell him how to prevent Americans from being robbed again.

It doesn't quite make sense how willing Moore is to contend that we should continue to hope Obama does something that would sharply contrast his history as a senator, presidential candidate, and as a president so far. What does make sense, however, is how Moore explains that Obama has been out there alone with little support from the Left in America.

Moore rightly contends to the audience that Obama made a huge error by choosing to go for a public option instead of a single-payer health care system. This gave progressives and liberals nothing to get excited about and as a result not enough from the Left have been out challenging the Right.

Moore says there is no crying in politics. Americans have to get busy themselves and cannot leave this up to a Michael Moore or Barack Obama. He asks the audience to organize around the movie and bring groups and unions to the film that will open in more than 1,000 theatres.

Moore's call received special attention on Real Time with Bill Maher. Not only was it mentioned briefly in the interview but Maher's New Rules seems to be a direct response to Moore's call to Americans to rise up and rebel against the very system that is turning them into slaves to the wealthy in America more and more every day. (Maher, as one might expect, does not really think Americans will get up and challenge the powers that be.)

Capitalism: A Love Story has the potential to tap into the anger boiling beneath the surface, anger that has manifested itself on the right but has unfortunately been stifled and stymied by progressives, liberals, activist organizations, and even unions.

A film laying out the situation succinctly like this doesn't come along every year or even every five years.

Americans must consider this film and begin to see those perpetuating the evils of capitalism as the organized crime family they are. They must get out there to not just push Obama to give Americans more change but also to demand a new set of policies or system that does away with the current economic system which enriches the greedy at the expense of the needy.

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Kevin Gosztola is a writer and curator of Firedoglake's blog The Dissenter, a blog covering civil liberties in the age of technology. He is an editor for OpEdNews.com and a former intern and videographer for The Nation Magazine.And, he's the (more...)
 
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The G20 is for more control of the economy of the ... by Steve Hanson on Monday, Oct 5, 2009 at 12:50:38 PM
How do you define capitalism? Is it the pursuit of... by Robert Fritsch on Monday, Oct 5, 2009 at 11:19:45 PM