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Andrew Bacevich: Even Dumb Ideas Have Consequences

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Where exactly to situate God in post-9/11 U.S. policy posed a genuine challenge for policymakers, not least of all for George W. Bush, who believed, no doubt sincerely, that God had chosen him to defend America in its time of maximum danger.  Unlike the communists, far from denying God's existence, Islamists embrace God with startling ferocity.  Indeed, in their vitriolic denunciations of the United States and in perpetrating acts of anti-American violence, they audaciously present themselves as nothing less than God's avenging agents.  In confronting the Great Satan, they claim to be doing God's will.

Waging War in Jesus's Name

This debate over who actually represents God's will is one that the successive administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama have studiously sought to avoid.  The United States is not at war with Islam per se, U.S. officials insist.  Still, among Muslims abroad, Washington's repeated denials notwithstanding, suspicion persists and not without reason.

Consider the case of Lieutenant General William G. ("Jerry") Boykin.  While still on active duty in 2002, this highly decorated Army officer spoke in uniform at a series of some 30 church gatherings during which he offered his own response to President Bush's famous question: "Why do they hate us?"  The general's perspective differed markedly from his commander-in-chief's:  "The answer to that is because we're a Christian nation.  We are hated because we are a nation of believers."

On another such occasion, the general recalled his encounter with a Somali warlord who claimed to enjoy Allah's protection.  The warlord was deluding himself, Boykin declared, and was sure to get his comeuppance: "I knew that my God was bigger than his.  I knew that my God was a real God and his was an idol."  As a Christian nation, Boykin insisted, the United States would succeed in overcoming its adversaries only if "we come against them in the name of Jesus."

When Boykin's remarks caught the attention of the mainstream press, denunciations rained down from on high, as the White House, the State Department, and the Pentagon hastened to disassociate the government from the general's views.  Yet subsequent indicators suggest that, however crudely, Boykin was indeed expressing perspectives shared by more than a few of his fellow citizens.

One such indicator came immediately: despite the furor, the general kept his important Pentagon job as deputy undersecretary of defense for intelligence, suggesting that the Bush administration considered his transgression minor.  Perhaps Boykin had spoken out of turn, but his was not a fireable offense.  (One can only speculate regarding the fate likely to befall a U.S. high-ranking officer daring to say of Israeli Prime Benjamin Netanyahu, "My God is a real God and his is an idol.")

A second indicator came in the wake of Boykin's retirement from active duty.  In 2012, the influential Family Research Council (FRC) in Washington hired the general to serve as the organization's executive vice-president.  Devoted to "advancing faith, family, and freedom," the council presents itself as emphatically Christian in its outlook.  FRC events routinely attract Republican Party heavyweights.  The organization forms part of the conservative mainstream, much as, say, the American Civil Liberties Union forms part of the left-liberal mainstream.

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So for the FRC to hire as its chief operating officer someone espousing Boykin's pronounced views regarding Islam qualifies as noteworthy.  At a minimum, those who recruited the former general apparently found nothing especially objectionable in his worldview.  They saw nothing politically risky about associating with Jerry Boykin.  He's their kind of guy. More likely, by hiring Boykin, the FRC intended to send a signal: on matters where their new COO claimed expertise -- above all, war -- thumb-in-your eye political incorrectness was becoming a virtue.  Imagine the NAACP electing Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan as its national president, thereby endorsing his views on race, and you get the idea.

What the FRC's embrace of General Boykin makes clear is this: to dismiss manifestations of Islamophobia simply as the work of an insignificant American fringe is mistaken.  As with the supporters of Senator Joseph McCarthy, who during the early days of the Cold War saw communists under every State Department desk, those engaging in these actions are daring to express openly attitudes that others in far greater numbers also quietly nurture.  To put it another way, what Americans in the 1950s knew as McCarthyism has reappeared in the form of Boykinism.

Historians differ passionately over whether McCarthyism represented a perversion of anti-Communism or its truest expression.  So, too, present-day observers will disagree as to whether Boykinism represents a merely fervent or utterly demented response to the Islamist threat.  Yet this much is inarguable: just as the junior senator from Wisconsin in his heyday embodied a non-trivial strain of American politics, so, too, does the former special-ops-warrior-turned-"ordained minister with a passion for spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ."

Notably, as Boykinism's leading exponent, the former general's views bear a striking resemblance to those favored by the late senator.  Like McCarthy, Boykin believes that, while enemies beyond America's gates pose great dangers, the enemy within poses a still greater threat.  "I've studied Marxist insurgency," he declared in a 2010 video.  "It was part of my training.  And the things I know that have been done in every Marxist insurgency are being done in America today."  Explicitly comparing the United States as governed by Barack Obama to Stalin's Soviet Union, Mao Zedong's China, and Fidel Castro's Cuba, Boykin charges that, under the guise of health reform, the Obama administration is secretly organizing a "constabulary force that will control the population in America."  This new force is, he claims, designed to be larger than the United States military, and will function just as Hitler's Brownshirts once did in Germany. All of this is unfolding before our innocent and unsuspecting eyes.

Boykinism: The New McCarthyism

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How many Americans endorsed McCarthy's conspiratorial view of national and world politics?  It's difficult to know for sure, but enough in Wisconsin to win him reelection in 1952, by a comfortable 54% to 46% majority.  Enough to strike fear into the hearts of politicians who quaked at the thought of McCarthy fingering them for being "soft on Communism."

How many Americans endorse Boykin's comparably incendiary views?  Again, it's difficult to tell.  Enough to persuade FRC's funders and supporters to hire him, confident that doing so would burnish, not tarnish, the organization's brand.  Certainly, Boykin has in no way damaged its ability to attract powerhouses of the domestic right.  FRC's recent "Values Voter Summit"  featured luminaries such as Republican vice-presidential nominee Paul Ryan, former Republican Senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, and Representative Michele Bachmann -- along with Jerry Boykin himself, who lectured attendees on "Israel, Iran, and the Future of Western Civilization." (In early August, Mitt Romney met privately with a group of "prominent social conservatives," including Boykin.)

Does their appearance at the FRC podium signify that Ryan, Santorum, Cantor, and Bachmann all subscribe to Boykinism's essential tenets?  Not any more than those who exploited the McCarthyite moment to their own political advantage  -- Richard Nixon, for example -- necessarily agreed with all of McCarthy's reckless accusations.  Yet the presence of leading Republicans on an FRC program featuring Boykin certainly suggests that they find nothing especially objectionable or politically damaging to them in his worldview.

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Tom Engelhardt, who runs the Nation Institute's Tomdispatch.com ("a regular antidote to the mainstream media"), is the co-founder of the American Empire Project and, most recently, the author of Mission Unaccomplished: Tomdispatch (more...)
 

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I don't believe you'll find many true believers of... by Vernon Huffman on Wednesday, Sep 26, 2012 at 2:51:43 PM