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Tomgram: Bill McKibben, The Most Important Story of Our Lives

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By now, it's already deep election season, the beginning of the culmination of a cycle that commenced the day after (or even the day before) the previous presidential election. In the meantime, the endless polls appear -- you can check Obama's approval rating or the state of the presidential horserace any time, night or day -- and the media goes ballistic handicapping the odds or discussing the presidential cat fight.  Each side's handlers take out after the other's, and increasingly, the corporate dollars pour in (another form of handicapping, or maybe just plain old knee-capping). You know the routine. These days, with the election a mere six months away, Romney/Obama "analysis" and prediction is already in the stratosphere and no issue, from war to a blind self-taught Chinese lawyer escaping to the American embassy in Beijing, is election-proof.

It's all grist for the mill and who in Washington isn't reading the polls the way a New Ager might read Tarot cards?  So when President Obama suddenly starts talking -- quite voluntarily -- about global warming as a campaign issue, you know something's up. What's up, it turns out, is public concern over climate change after years of polling in which Americans claimed to be ever less worried about the phenomenon. 

No one should be surprised, given this overheated year in North America, as Bill McKibben points out in today's post. In fact, in the latest climate-change polling, 63% of respondents believe "the United States should move forward to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, regardless of what other countries do." In another recent poll, 65% of Americans backed the idea of "imposing mandatory controls on carbon dioxide emissions/other greenhouse gases" (as 75% now support regulating carbon dioxide as a "pollutant").

This is something new in America. Times, like the weather, are evidently a-changin'. And the president has noticed this, especially since he's facing an opponent who, last fall, went on the record this way: "My view is that we don't know what's causing climate change on this planet. And the idea of spending trillions and trillions of dollars to try to reduce CO2 emissions is not the right course for us."

So this may be a bullish campaign season for climate change.  "I suspect," said the president, "that over the next six months, this is going to be a debate that will become part of the campaign, and I will be very clear in voicing my belief that we're going to have to take further steps to deal with climate change in a serious way."  It could even help win him the election, if this summer and fall prove just as weather-freaky as our North American winter and spring have been, leaving Republican climate-change deniers and prevaricators in the dust.

If, in a far less propitious political moment, one person put climate change back on the White House agenda and made the president attend to it, that would be TomDispatch regular Bill McKibben. The campaign of mass action he launched against the Keystone XL Pipeline and the particularly "dirty" form of energy it was slated to bring from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast proved crucial. Let's hope, like the cavalry, that he arrived in the nick of time. Tom

Too Hot Not to Notice?
A Planet Connected by Wild Weather
By Bill McKibben

The Williams River was so languid and lovely last Saturday morning that it was almost impossible to imagine the violence with which it must have been running on August 28, 2011. And yet the evidence was all around: sand piled high on its banks, trees still scattered as if by a giant's fist, and most obvious of all, a utilitarian temporary bridge where for 140 years a graceful covered bridge had spanned the water.

The YouTube video of that bridge crashing into the raging river was Vermont's iconic image from its worst disaster in memory, the record flooding that followed Hurricane Irene's rampage through the state in August 2011. It claimed dozens of lives, as it cut more than a billion-dollar swath of destruction across the eastern United States.

I watched it on TV in Washington just after emerging from jail, having been arrested at the White House during mass protests of the Keystone XL pipeline. Since Vermont's my home, it took the theoretical -- the ever more turbulent, erratic, and dangerous weather that the tar sands pipeline from Canada would help ensure -- and made it all too concrete. It shook me bad.

And I'm not the only one.

New data released last month by researchers at Yale and George Mason universities show that a lot of Americans are growing far more concerned about climate change, precisely because they're drawing the links between freaky weather, a climate kicked off-kilter by a fossil-fuel guzzling civilization, and their own lives. After a year with a record number of multi-billion dollar weather disasters, seven in ten Americans now believe that "global warming is affecting the weather." No less striking, 35% of the respondents reported that extreme weather had affected them personally in 2011.  As Yale's Anthony Laiserowitz told the New York Times, "People are starting to connect the dots."

Which is what we must do. As long as this remains one abstract problem in the long list of problems, we'll never get to it. There will always be something going on each day that's more important, including, if you're facing flood or drought, the immediate danger.

But in reality, climate change is actually the biggest thing that's going on every single day. If we could only see that pattern we'd have a fighting chance. It's like one of those trompe l'oeil puzzles where you can only catch sight of the real picture by holding it a certain way. So this weekend we'll be doing our best to hold our planet a certain way so that the most essential pattern is evident. At 350.org, we're organizing a global day of action that's all about dot-connecting; in fact, you can follow the action at climatedots.org.

The day will begin in the Marshall Islands of the far Pacific, where the sun first rises on our planet, and where locals will hold a daybreak underwater demonstration on their coral reef already threatened by rising seas. They'll hold, in essence, a giant dot -- and so will our friends in Bujumbura, Burundi, where March flooding destroyed 500 homes. In Dakar, Senegal, they'll mark the tidal margins of recent storm surges.  In Adelaide, Australia, activists will host a "dry creek regatta" to highlight the spreading drought down under.

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But you can't get it from Corporate media.... by thepiffler on Saturday, May 5, 2012 at 5:19:39 PM
One of the main reasons I voted for Obama in 2008 ... by Philip Pease on Sunday, May 6, 2012 at 12:14:34 PM