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The Three Biggest Democratic Takeaways from Election 2012

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It's not too early to draw some lessons. Regardless of what happens Tuesday, Democrats should have three big takeaways from the 2012 election.

Lesson One: Democrats Can Own the Future

Latinos, African-Americans, young people, and women have become the major Democratic voting blocs. That's good news for Democrats because the first three constitute a growing percentage of the voting population (young people eventually become the entire voting population), while women continue to gain economic ground.

The challenge for Democrats will be to hold these groups in the future. All have been attracted to the Democratic Party in recent years mainly because Republican policies have turned them off -- policies like the GOP's draconian responses to undocumented workers, its eagerness to slash Medicaid and food stamps, its misogynistic approach to abortion, and its demand to cut federal spending on education and student loans.

But if Democrats want to keep their loyalty over the long term, the Party will need to do more than rely on Republican electoral stupidity. After all, the GOP might learn it has to become (or appear to become) more inclusive.

Democrats will need to champion policies especially important to these groups -- for example, immigration reforms that take account of how long someone has been in the United States and how much they've contributed as workers and citizens; paid family and medical leave for women (as well as men) who must care for their families in emergencies; expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit, providing larger income supplements to lower-income workers; and income-contingent college loans, allowing them to be repaid as a fixed percentage of full-time jobs over a limited number of years.

All these have the added advantage of being good policies, regardless of their political attractiveness.

Lesson Two: No Matter How "Business-Friendly" Democrats Are, Big Business and Wall Street Will Still go Republican

No administration in recent memory has done more for business and Wall Street than Obama's. It bailed out Wall Street (granted, the bailout was initiated under George W. Bush, but most of it -- and its execution -- happened under Obama) and never demanded in return that the biggest banks modify the mortgages of Americans who were caught by the bursting of the housing bubble. And the Obama Administration still hasn't brought a single criminal charge against any Wall Street executive.

The Administration also spearheaded a giant stimulus package that kept the economy from falling off a cliff, that generated fat profits for the construction industry, and ultimately pushed stock prices back to where they were before the bubble burst.

The Administration's Affordable Care Act created 23 million mandated customers for health insurance companies, and billions of dollars worth of new business for America's largest pharmaceutical companies and hospital chains.

Yet notwithstanding all of this, big business and Wall Street threw in their lot with Mitt Romney and the GOP.

This isn't to say corporate executives and Wall Street traders will always side exclusively with Republicans. Typically, they'll hedge their bets -- giving Democrats just enough campaign money to keep them in line.

But they'll always donate more to the GOP, because the Republican Party will always outdo Democrats when it comes to making corporate executives and Wall Street traders richer by lowering their taxes, subsidizing their businesses, and abandoning regulations that stand in the way of bigger profits.

The lesson is so-called "business friendly" policies that translate into more money for top executives don't pay off for Democrats. Democrats should push economic policies that are good for the middle class, and for everyone aspiring to join it.

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http://robertreich.org/

Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new film, "Inequality for All," to be released September 27. He blogs at www.robertreich.org.

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They could have insisted all trade-opening treatie... by PCM on Saturday, Nov 3, 2012 at 12:43:53 AM