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Connecting the Crazy Dots: Assange, Recruiting Kids, The Tucson Massacre and General American Bloodthirstiness

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Headlined to H2 1/11/11

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By Dave Lindorff

There is, it cannot be denied, a tendency on the part of many Americans to grab for their guns, if not actually, then figuratively.

And let's face it, we also have an awful lot of guns to reach for. The FBI estimates that it's 200 million, not counting the guns owned by the military, and the National Rifle Assn. says that's a number that rises by close to five million a year.

And we sure do use "em. NY Times columnist Bob Herbert says 150,000 people have been killed by guns in the US just in the first decade of this new century. Clearly it's not just Tucson, capital of the Arizona county that also includes the gunslinger town of Tombstone, that is the Wild West. This whole country is gun-crazy.

Back in the 1970s, when I was a journalist in Los Angeles, I witnessed police officers there drawing their guns on people being arrested for jaywalking. One poor guy was shot dead by accident because a cop who had made a traffic stop had his gun out and tripped as he approached the driver's window. Honest. I reported on a case where a young man, Ron Burkholder, apparently burned badly while making some PCP in his basement so that he had torn of his clothes and run out onto the street naked, was shot dead by a cop. The thing was, Burkholder was a small skinny guy, and he was naked and clearly in pain. The cop, well over six feet tall and powerfully built, blew Burkholder away with, if I remember right, five shots from his service revolver. Not one. Five.

His excuse: He "felt threatened" by the naked, and clearly unarmed, Burkholder.

No charges were filed.

When Julian Assange's Wikileaks, in conjunction with several large media organizations including the New York Times, the UK Guardian and the German magazine Der Spiegel, released leaked cables that showed both the pettiness and the bullying of the US State Department, there were immediate howls from members of Congress and from the right-wing talk radio and TV crowd for his summary execution. The more sedate called for his arrest, trial and execution. Now his lawyer in the UK has quite rightly made the argument, at a hearing on a Swedish government extradition request on possible sex offense charges, that Assange faces the very real possibility of execution if extradited to Sweden because he could end up being snatched from that country by the US, and brought back to face a death penalty for his exposes, which the US would like to call "espionage."

None of this bothers a lot of Americans, who seem to think summary execution without even a trial for just about anything is quite okay.  Many Americans even say they think the death penalty is not only a good thing, but that we should be executing more people, and doing it faster. This despite recent solid evidence from Texas that innocent people are being executed, and despite the reality that over 140 people having been absolved by incontrovertible DNA tests of capital crimes for which they spent years on death row, sometimes coming within hours of execution.

That may explain why so many politicians these days, and self-proclaimed pundits like the corpulent druggie Rush Limbaugh and the Vicks addict Glenn Beck, call for the killing of those whose politics they don't agree with.

It also, sadly, explains why so many young people respond positively to the lures of military recruiters, like the young friend I wrote about just recently.  

It was simply shocking for me to hear a 17-year-old kid from a family of two professionals, neither of whom has any military background, talking excitedly about wanting to be a machine gunner in a Marine helicopter, and anxious to be sent to fight in Afghanistan.  What kind of attraction can there be to firing waves of 30mm rounds at people down on the ground who have never done anything to you, who pose no threat to your family or your country, and who may not even be fighters at all?

It's as bizarre and alien to me as the people who thrill at the idea of shooting wild wolves from the air--a popular sport in Alaska fondly described as wholesome entertainment by America's sweetheart, Sarah Palin.

I brought my son and a friend last year to the notorious Army Experience Center, a multi-million state-of-the-art virtual war recruiting wonderland based in a mall in Northeast Philadelphia. Filled with an array of very fast computers and video screens on which kids  as young as 14 could blast away in realistic war scenarios, and featuring two darkened rooms that had real bodies of an armored Humvee and a Blackhawk helicopter where kids could man the guns and operate in a 3-D video environment with surround sound so that you felt like you were moving through hostile territory and had to "take out" the "bad guys" while quickly identifying innocent civilians and avoiding shooting them.  My son, his friend and I tried the Humvee out, and at the end of our "mission," the recruiter, an Iraq vet, congratulated us, saying we were "the best gunners all day!" and that our error rate had been "only 30%."

      I asked him what "error rate" meant, and he said, "Collateral damage--civilians killed."

"30 percent of the peope we just killed were civilians?" I asked, aghast.

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Dave Lindorff is a founding member of the collectively-owned, journalist-run online newspaper www.thiscantbehappening.net. He is a columnist for Counterpunch, is author of several recent books ("This Can't Be Happening! Resisting the (more...)
 
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Harry and Sally and Dick and Jane. Spot. Every... by Ned Lud on Tuesday, Jan 11, 2011 at 6:47:46 PM
All the loonies that come ranting out of the woodw... by Allen Oliver on Tuesday, Jan 11, 2011 at 8:23:51 PM
'Avoid rather than check; check rather than hurt; ... by Ned Lud on Wednesday, Jan 12, 2011 at 6:43:26 AM
Putting down pots and pans to catch the leaking wa... by Allen Oliver on Wednesday, Jan 12, 2011 at 11:40:20 AM
If it was taken as that, but what I was saying is ... by Allen Oliver on Wednesday, Jan 12, 2011 at 1:26:32 PM
The military, the press and Hollywood have taken t... by myklsamu on Wednesday, Jan 12, 2011 at 6:03:10 AM
Too much emphasis is put on the Arizona shooting. ... by Steven G. Erickson on Wednesday, Jan 12, 2011 at 1:01:25 PM
There is no obligation for police officers to prot... by Steven G. Erickson on Wednesday, Jan 12, 2011 at 1:02:26 PM
One of the solutions promoted by members of "our" ... by Robert P. Philipps on Thursday, Jan 13, 2011 at 4:56:59 PM