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Big Brother Internet

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This article cross-posted from Paul CraigRoberts.com


Dear friends: I am pleased to bring to you Gerald Celente's assessment of the threats posed to Internet freedom. Celente's Trends Journal is one of the most insightful publications of our era. PCR

Do you remember the Safe-Cyber instructions they taught you in the mandatory Computer Ed class (operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology)? First you fire up your Secured Computing Device (SCD) and its hardware token authenticator.

Then you enter the six-digit algorithmically generated password displayed (a new one flashes every 60 seconds) and are asked to supply your biometric identifier. You place your thumb on the built-in fingerprint pad, click, and wait for the Internet connection to begin. But it doesn't.

Instead, the screen goes black for a second before the dreaded words appear: "Malware has been detected on this SCD. As mandated by federal law, it has been placed in quarantine." Then the machine shuts down.

This is not just conjecture, but an imminent scenario. Policies, such as the White House proposed "National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace," which will transform the character, culture and freedom of the Internet, are already in place. The 20 cybersecurity-related bills introduced in the Senate in 2011, and the dozen introduced in the House of Representatives, have wound their way through committees and, according to Senator Harry Reid, are scheduled to be voted on in the first quarter of 2012. Almost all of them, with the blessing of the White House, would make the Department of Homeland Security the overseer of private-sector networks.

Considering the apocalyptic rhetoric coming from Washington and the ranks of cybersecurity experts -- echoed by media reports that portray every picayune data breach as Armageddon -- it would appear that the vulnerability of the Internet has been underplayed for many years.

In the Internet's start-up decades, both industry and government were committed to establishing an atmosphere of trust that would draw the public into conducting more and more digital business. Though data breaches, theft of trade secrets, identity theft and bank robbery have been a fact of Internet life since its beginnings, there were few laws requiring disclosure. Banks and credit card firms ate their losses as a cost of doing business, and the giant corporations kept mum rather than roil the public. Recently, the pendulum has swung in the other direction and a raucous alarm has been sounded regarding the great danger posed by the Internet.

The Nation is at a crossroads. The globally-interconnected digital information and communications infrastructure known as "cyberspace" underpins almost every facet of modern society and provides critical support for the U.S. economy, civil infrastructure, public safety, and national security. This technology has transformed the global economy and connected people in ways never imagined. Yet, cybersecurity risks pose some of the most serious economic and national security challenges of the 21st century. The digital infrastructure's architecture was driven more by considerations of interoperability and efficiency than of security. Consequently, a growing array of state and non-state actors are compromising, stealing, changing, or destroying information and could cause critical disruptions to U.S. systems. (White House Cyberspace Policy Review, 2011)

While there may be other factors behind the current wave of cybersecurity alarmism, we have identified three major forces: The Government, the Cybersecurity-Industrial complex, and the so-called "Hacktivists."

The Hacktivists LulzSec and Anonymous, the most-publicized of the hacktivists, along with a growing community of ad hoc cyberactors, have had a multi-faceted impact on the cybersecurity environment that goes far beyond the number of hackers at work or the amount of actual damage their exploits have inflicted.

They have skillfully publicized their outsized, headline-ready cyberintrusions. Their attacks, which are something other than the garden variety cybercrime, have compromised the web assets of Sony, the CIA, Fox News, the Church of Scientology, Bank of America and many more. Beyond the financial damage and security breaches, they've created a public relations nightmare forcing these major institutions to go public with what they would otherwise go to great lengths to conceal.

As a result, attention has been focused on the inadequacies of Internet security. If organizations as large, powerful and security-conscious as these are vulnerable, who then is safe? Not only have the targets been breached and embarrassed, consumer trust in the Internet has also been shaken.

These high profile, anarchic Internet exploits -- compounded by the role of social media in evading and undermining government control of the political and media arena (Arab Spring, Occupy Wall Street, etc.) -- have intensified government efforts to clamp down on the Internet " while providing the media with scary cyber-stories to further that agenda.

The Government The US government agenda to control the Internet is at least a decade old. Just three months after the Bush White House created the Department of Homeland Security, it issued "The National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace." The document begins:

My Fellow Americans:
The way business is transacted, government operates, and national defense is conducted have changed. These activities now rely on an interdependent network of information technology infrastructures called cyberspace. The National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace provides a framework for protecting this infrastructure that is essential to our economy, security, and way of life.

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http://www.paulcraigroberts.org/

Dr. Roberts was Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury for Economic Policy in the Reagan Administration. He was associate editor and columnist with the Wall Street Journal, columnist for Business Week and the Scripps Howard News Service. He is a contributing editor to Gerald Celente's Trends Journal. He has had numerous university appointments. His book, The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism and Economic Dissolution of the West is available here. His latest book,  How America Was Lost, has just been released and can be ordered here.

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Always in the avant garde of issues that could pos... by AAA AAA on Monday, Jan 30, 2012 at 2:13:26 PM
If the US Government and FBI were so hot on intern... by Steven G. Erickson on Monday, Jan 30, 2012 at 3:51:38 PM
I offer this in full risk of ridicule or reprisal.... by Paul Repstock on Monday, Jan 30, 2012 at 5:27:43 PM
My email just crashed..LOL... by Paul Repstock on Monday, Jan 30, 2012 at 6:26:55 PM
It was obvious something was bad wrong with the se... by Mike Preston on Monday, Jan 30, 2012 at 8:56:55 PM
For an old slow, 'can't jump' white guy, PCR does ... by Ned Lud on Tuesday, Jan 31, 2012 at 5:13:46 AM
You like many others on this forum have the integr... by Paul Repstock on Tuesday, Jan 31, 2012 at 1:32:43 PM