Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 2 Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend 7 (9 Shares)  
Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites View Stats   9 comments

OpEdNews Op Eds

Bear Raiders: How Short Sellers Fleece Investors

By (about the author)     Permalink       (Page 1 of 2 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 7   Valuable 5   Well Said 4  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H2 10/1/11

Become a Fan
  (173 fans)


Short Selling by eHow Money

"Unrestrained financial exploitations have been one of the great causes of our present tragic condition."

                                -- President Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933  

Why did gold and silver stocks just get hammered, at a time when commodities are considered a safe haven against widespread global uncertainty?   The answer, according to Bill Murphy's newsletter LeMetropoleCafe.com, is that the sector has been the target of massive short selling.   For some popular precious metal stocks, close to half the trades have been "phantom" sales by short sellers who did not actually own the stock.  

A bear raid is the practice of targeting a stock or other asset for take-down, either for quick profits or for corporate takeover.   Today the target is commodities, but tomorrow it could be something else.   When Lehman Brothers went bankrupt in September 2008, some analysts thought the investment firm's condition was no worse than its competitors'.   What brought it down was not undercapitalization but a massive bear raid on 9-11 of that year, when its stock price dropped by 41% in a single day.

The stock market has been plagued by these speculative attacks ever since the four-year industry-wide bear raid called the Great Depression, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average was reduced to 10 percent of its former value.   Whenever the market decline slowed, speculators would step in to sell millions of dollars worth of stock they did not own but had ostensibly borrowed just for purposes of sale, using the device known as the short sale.   When done on a large enough scale, short selling can force prices down, allowing assets to be picked up very cheaply.  

Another Great Depression is the short seller's dream, as a trader recently admitted on a BBC interview.   His candor was unusual, but his attitude is characteristic of a business that is all about making money, regardless of the damage done to real companies contributing real goods and services to the economy.

How the Game Is Played

Here is how the short selling scheme works: stock prices are set by traders called "market makers," whose job is to match buyers with sellers.   Short sellers willing to sell at the market price are matched with the highest buy orders first, but if sales volume is large, they wind up matched with the bargain-basement bidders, bringing the overall price down.   Price is set by supply and demand, and when the supply of stocks available for sale is artificially high, the price drops.   When the bear raiders are successful, they are able to buy back the stock to cover their short sales at a price that is artificially low.

Today they only have to trigger the "stop loss" orders of investors to initiate a cascade of selling.   Many investors protect themselves from sudden drops in price by placing a standing "stop loss" order, which is activated if the market price falls below a certain price.   These orders act like a pre-programmed panic button, which can trigger further selling and more downward pressure on the stock price.  

Another destabilizing factor is "margin selling": many speculative investors borrow against their holdings to leverage their investment, and when the value of their holdings goes down, the brokerage may force them to come up with additional cash on short notice or else sell into the bear market.   Again the result is something that looks like a panic, causing the stock price to overreact and drop precipitously.  

Where do the short sellers get the shares to sell into the market?   As Jim Puplava explained on FinancialSense.com on September 24, 2011, they "borrow" shares from the unwitting true shareholders.   When a brokerage firm opens an account for a new customer, it is usually a "margin" account--one that allows the investor to buy stock on margin, or by borrowing against the investor's stock.   This is done although most investors never use the margin feature and are unaware that they have that sort of account.   The brokers do it because they can "rent" the stock in a margin account for a substantial fee--sometimes as much as 30% interest for a stock in short supply.   Needless to say, the real shareholders get none of this tidy profit.   Worse, they can be seriously harmed by the practice.   They bought the stock because they believed in the company and wanted to see its business thrive, not dive.   Their shares are being used to bet against their own interests.

There is another problem with short selling: the short seller is allowed to vote the shares at shareholder meetings.   To avoid having to reveal what is going on, stock brokers send proxies to the "real" owners as well; but that means there are duplicate proxies floating around.   Brokers know that many shareholders won't go to the trouble of voting their shares; and when too many proxies do come in for a particular vote, the totals are just reduced proportionately to "fit."   But that means the real votes of real stock owners may be thrown out.   Hedge funds may engage in short selling just to vote on particular issues in which they are interested, such as hostile corporate takeovers.   Since many shareholders don't send in their proxies, interested short sellers can swing the vote in a direction that hurts the interests of those with a real stake in the corporation.            

Lax Regulation

Some of the damage caused by short selling was blunted by the Securities Act of 1933, which imposed an "uptick" rule and forbade "naked" short selling.   But both of these regulations have been circumvented today.  

The uptick rule required a stock's price to be higher than its previous sale price before a short sale could be made, preventing a cascade of short sales when stocks were going down.   But in July 2007, the uptick rule was repealed.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

Ellen Brown is an attorney, founder of the Public Banking Institute, and author of twelve books including the best-selling WEB OF DEBT. In THE PUBLIC BANK SOLUTION, her latest book, she explores successful public banking models historically and (more...)
 

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon


Go To Commenting

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Follow Me on Twitter

Contact Author Contact Editor View Authors' Articles

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

It's the Derivatives, Stupid! Why Fannie, Freddie and AIG Had to Be Bailed Out

Mysterious Prison Buses in the Desert

LANDMARK DECISION PROMISES MASSIVE RELIEF FOR HOMEOWNERS AND TROUBLE FOR BANKS

Libya: All About Oil, or All About Central Banking?

Borrowing from Peter to Pay Paul: The Wall Street Ponzi Scheme Called Fractional Reserve Banking

"Oops, We Meant $7 TRILLION!" What Hank and Ben Are Up to and How They Plan to Pay for It All

Comments

The time limit for entering new comments on this article has expired.

This limit can be removed. Our paid membership program is designed to give you many benefits, such as removing this time limit. To learn more, please click here.

Comments: Expand   Shrink   Hide  
8 people are discussing this page, with 9 comments
To view all comments:
Expand Comments
(Or you can set your preferences to show all comments, always)

Thanks, Ellen Brown, for exposing this racket. How... by Ernie Messerschmidt on Saturday, Oct 1, 2011 at 10:24:42 AM
I used to work on Wall Street and I never understo... by Howard Schneider on Saturday, Oct 1, 2011 at 10:32:31 AM
That everything in the article is true and complet... by BFalcon on Saturday, Oct 1, 2011 at 10:18:29 PM
We need some grassroots action to rein in our run... by Mike Preston on Saturday, Oct 1, 2011 at 1:44:20 PM
Thanks for proving that Wall Street is rigged, and... by Mari Eliza on Saturday, Oct 1, 2011 at 5:21:50 PM
How much of what Ellen just said will ever b... by Richard Clark on Saturday, Oct 1, 2011 at 8:39:58 PM
Richard, how can banks make out like bandits if th... by Tom Chechatka on Sunday, Oct 2, 2011 at 1:35:29 PM
Great piece, Ms. Brown. The market is rigged in bo... by lila york on Sunday, Oct 2, 2011 at 9:31:52 AM
I quite agree that, the regulatory disposition you... by Tom Chechatka on Sunday, Oct 2, 2011 at 1:00:13 PM