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9 Facts That Prove Joe Stiglitz Is Right About Climate Change Hurting The Economy

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At www.huffingtonpost.com


Climate change is a leading global cause of death, responsible for an estimated 5 million deaths each year.
(image by Oxfam for Flickr)

Economist Joseph Stiglitz recently announced that he believes climate change is the most important issue facing the U.S. economy today. Certainly, climate change is serious global issue, but how exactly will it affect the U.S. economy? What follows are some statistics on climate change's impact on the U.S. economy, gathered primarily from non-governmental organizations that deal with climate-change issues. Climate change is projected to cost the average U.S. household $1,250 per year by 2020, $1,800 per year by 2040 and $2,750 per year by 2080. Climate change will likely cost the U.S. economy $3.8 billion per year by 2020, $6.5 billion per year by 2040 and $12.9 billion by 2080. The U.S. economy may be held back by 2% of GDP over the next 20 years because of climate change. Failure to act on climate change already costs the world economy 1.2 trillion dollars...

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An economic argument for taxing carbon and thus re... by Simon Leigh on Wednesday, Jan 9, 2013 at 9:23:08 AM
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